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So, I have a bug to remove

foreach (XElement x in items.Elements("x")) 
{
    XElement result = webservice.method(x);

    if (/*condition based on values in result*/) 
    {
    	x.Remove();
    }
}

The problem is that calling x.Remove() alters the foreach such that if there are two Elements("x"), and the first is removed, the loop doesn't get to the second x element.

So how should I be looping this? Or should this be rewritten another way?

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6  
I actually have just modified the foreach to be "foreach (XElement x in items.Elements("x").Reverse())" and that seems to work fine as the problem before was the foreach moved the index up, and the Remove shifted everything down, causing items to be skipped. Reversing the order seems to make sense. But, I'll leave the question opened in case someone has a better solution. –  CaffGeek Oct 7 '09 at 17:00
    
I did a for loop where I had to do a i-- if it actually removed an item to compensate for the index. Your way with the reverse doesn't seem like a bad option either though, but I am not a .NET expert, so I am a little skeptical of what I say, lol. –  Xaisoft Oct 7 '09 at 17:09
    
retaged to C#3.0. There is no C# with version 3.5 (see this post for details stackoverflow.com/questions/247621/…) –  Vaccano Oct 16 '09 at 19:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 22 down vote accepted

I suspect that Linq may be able to help you out here as follows.

using System.Linq;

void foo()
{
    items.Elements("x")
         .Where(x => condition(webservice.method(x)))
         .Remove();
}

If that doesn't work (i.e. the internal enumerator is still invalidated), make a shallow copy of the selected elements and delete them as follows.

using System.Linq;

void foo()
{
    List xElements = items.Elements("x")
                          .Where(x => condition(webservice.method(x)))
                          .ToList();

    for (int i = xElements.Count; i > 0 xElements.Count; --i)
    {
        xElements[i].Remove();
    }
}
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+1 Ideal situation if you are using .Net 3.5 –  Tom Anderson Oct 9 '09 at 18:08
    
The first code snippet worked for me. Great solution. +1 –  Alex York Apr 21 '10 at 9:55
    
Note that each Remove() walks the internal linked list of child elements from the first child onwards, hence the computational complexity of each remove is O(N). Is there an O(1) way of removing elements? –  locster Nov 26 at 11:39

Create a collection before the loop logic, add the elements to be removed to the new collection, then call the items.Remove on each element in the new collection.

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This should work. I remember doing this. My answer is probably not good. I remember something about if you make changes to a list or something, it is a good idea to use for, but if you are just looping through without making any changes, foreach is fine. Is this correct? –  Xaisoft Oct 7 '09 at 16:55

Try it without a for instead of the foreach.

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