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I've written some code which renders a 3D world from a heightmap, and I now have the code which allows for walking written as well. The problem is, when increasing in altitude, the animation almost "jumps", as each unit is rather large. Is there a simple way I could make the animation a bit smoother? (I'm extremely new to OpenGL and 3D rendering in general, so I'd prefer not to get into interpolation and more complex things.)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Are you asking help on how to move smoothly? Like with acceleration?

if so you can do something like this:

Your player class should have a position,velocity and a direction vector. add your velocity to your position constantly, like this

//mainloop...
{
position.add(velocity);
}

at rest you velocity is <0,0,0> so there is no position change, to move the playing simply add a percentage of your direction to you velocity like this.

if(Key.W)
velocity.add(direction);

this is basicly acceleration. now to stop, you should add a percentage of your direction vector to your velocity, but in the opposite direction.

public class Camera
{
    public final static Camera VIEW = new Camera();
    //
    public Vector3 position; 
    public Vector3 directionalVelocity, angularVelocity;
    public Vector3 rotation;
    public Vector3 cameraDirectionVector; // vector pointing in direction of camera

    public Camera()
    {
        this.position = new Vector3(0,0,0);
        this.rotation = new Vector3(0,0,0);
        this.directionalVelocity = new Vector3(0, 0, 0);
        this.angularVelocity = new Vector3(0, 0, 0);
        this.cameraDirectionVector = new Vector3(0, 0, 0);
        Mouse.setGrabbed(true);
    }
    public void setPosition(float x, float y, float z)
    {
        this.position.set(x, y, z);
    }
    public void setRotation(float x, float y, float z)
    {
        this.rotation.set(x, y, z);
    }

    private float walkAcc = 0.2f;
    private float mouseAcc = 0.2f;

    public void update()
    {
        GL11.glLoadIdentity(); // reset matrix
        GL11.glRotatef(rotation.x, 1, 0, 0);
        GL11.glRotatef(rotation.y, 0, 1, 0);
        GL11.glRotatef(rotation.z, 0, 0, 1);
        GL11.glTranslatef(position.x, position.y, position.z);
        //
            // mouse Input , increment angularVelocity
        if(Mouse.isGrabbed())
        {
            float mouseX = Mouse.getDX() * mouseAcc;
            float mouseY = Mouse.getDY() * mouseAcc;
            if(mouseY > 0 && this.rotation.x > -90)
                this.angularVelocity.x -= mouseY;
            if(mouseY < 0 && this.rotation.x < 90)
                this.angularVelocity.x += -mouseY;
            if(mouseX > 0)
                this.angularVelocity.y += mouseX;
            if(mouseX < 0)
                this.angularVelocity.y -= -mouseX;
                    // slow down mouse velocity
            this.applyFriction(this.angularVelocity, 0.4f);  
        }
        //
            // Keyboard input , add direction to velocity
        if(Keyboard.isKeyDown(Keyboard.KEY_W))
            this.walkForward(this.walkAcc);
        if(Keyboard.isKeyDown(Keyboard.KEY_S))
            this.walkBackwards(this.walkAcc);
        if(Keyboard.isKeyDown(Keyboard.KEY_D))
            this.strafeRight(this.walkAcc);
        if(Keyboard.isKeyDown(Keyboard.KEY_A))
            this.strafeLeft(this.walkAcc);
        if(Keyboard.isKeyDown(Keyboard.KEY_SPACE))
            this.directionalVelocity.y -= walkAcc;
        if(Keyboard.isKeyDown(Keyboard.KEY_LSHIFT))
            this.directionalVelocity.y += walkAcc;
            //
        //slow down walk speed
        this.applyFriction(this.directionalVelocity, 0.09f);
        //
            // add velocity to position
        this.position.add(this.directionalVelocity);
        this.rotation.add(this.angularVelocity);
        //
        this.updateCameraDirectionVector();
    }

   // Calculates a vector pointing in the direction of your cross hair
    public Vector3 updateCameraDirectionVector() 
    {

        //x = rsin(angle1)cos(angle2)
        //y = rsin(angle1)sin(angle2)
        //z = rcos(angle1)

        this.cameraDirectionVector.x = (float) (Math.sin(Math.toRadians(rotation.y)) * Math.cos(Math.toRadians(rotation.x)));
        this.cameraDirectionVector.z = (float) (-Math.cos(Math.toRadians(rotation.y)) * Math.cos(Math.toRadians(rotation.x)));
        this.cameraDirectionVector.y = (float) -Math.sin(Math.toRadians(rotation.x)); // good
        return this.cameraDirectionVector;
    }
    public void applyFriction(Vector3 vector, float speed)
    {
        //add a percentage of opposite direction to current direction
        vector.x += -vector.x * speed;
        vector.y += -vector.y * speed;
        vector.z += -vector.z * speed;
    }
    public void walkForward(float distance)
    {
        this.directionalVelocity.x -= this.cameraDirectionVector.x * distance;
        this.directionalVelocity.y -= this.cameraDirectionVector.y * distance;
        this.directionalVelocity.z -= this.cameraDirectionVector.z * distance;

    }
    public void walkBackwards(float distance)
    {
        this.directionalVelocity.x += this.cameraDirectionVector.x * distance;
        this.directionalVelocity.y += this.cameraDirectionVector.y * distance;
        this.directionalVelocity.z += this.cameraDirectionVector.z * distance;

    }
    public void strafeLeft(float distance)
    {
        // cross product with (0,1,0) ... y unit vector..
        this.directionalVelocity.x += -this.cameraDirectionVector.z * distance;
        this.directionalVelocity.z += this.cameraDirectionVector.x * distance;

    }
    public void strafeRight(float distance)
    {
        // cross product with -(0,1,0) ... y unit vector..
        this.directionalVelocity.x -= -this.cameraDirectionVector.z * distance;
        this.directionalVelocity.z -= this.cameraDirectionVector.x * distance;

    }
    @Override
    public String toString()
    {
        return this.position.x + " " + this.position.y + " " + this.position.z;
    }
}

// this is a basic vector class, i simplified it so its easy to read.

public class Vector3
{
   public float x,y,z;
   public Vector3(float x,float y, float z)
   {
   this.x = x;
   this.y = y;
   this.z = z;
   }
   public void add(Vector3 v)
   {
    this.x += v.x;
    this.y += v.y;
    this.z += v.z;
   }
 public void set(float x, float y ,float z)
   {
    this.x = x;
    this.y = y;
    this.z = z;
   }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Alright, this is pretty helpful! If I use this code, it will basically automatically change the position at the set direction and velocity, given I'm setting the FP view to that of the camera in the game loop? I should mention that my camera class is basically what you referred to as the player class. –  mproncace Mar 14 '13 at 22:49
    
right, but you need to calculate the direction with some trig. basicly your constantly calculating the direction you want to travel and when your hit a key to move it adds that direction to your velocity. This will give a very smooth animation. you can use this for the mouse to. In your camera class you will have a rotation vector and a angularVelocity vector. Here ill just show you my camera class. –  JavaNewb Mar 14 '13 at 23:18
    
Now I'm really confused. One, Vector3 isn't a valid type in LWJGL; Vector3f is used instead. Two, Vector3f.add() requires 3 Vector3f arguments, whereas your code only supplies one. I understand what you're saying, but I'm really confused as to how to implement it. –  mproncace Mar 14 '13 at 23:41
    
a yes sorry about that i created my own vector class called vector3 if you want just change everything to the lwjgl vector3f. ill show you a simple vector3 class that you can use for this. –  JavaNewb Mar 15 '13 at 0:07
1  
decreasing its y positions will make a very jerky looking motion, instead decrease its y velocity until it reaches the preferred y elevation. –  JavaNewb Mar 20 '13 at 4:03

Try doing some trigonometry -- map points in an integer array:

int [x][y][z]

You can even make the game do this for you. Get creative with it. Then make a loop that maps each point out for the "player" to stand on top of. If it still doesn't work, try the same method with 0.5 increments with float. Hope I helped. :)

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Ah, I think I see what you're getting at. Instead of directly modifying the camera's position, use separate coordinates with smaller increments? Although, I'm not quite sure how trigonometry would tie into this. –  mproncace Mar 11 '13 at 4:02
    
@mproncace I was saying use trigonometry to calculate where the next whole-number point would be in the world, but you might could just use the height-map instead, haha. –  Zac Canoy Mar 11 '13 at 12:59
    
Alright, I think I'll try just using the map, seeing as I kind of hate trigonometry. –  mproncace Mar 11 '13 at 20:58
    
@mproncace Yes it can be annoying, unless you practice it. Logicalize it lol. That's my word of the day :) –  Zac Canoy Mar 11 '13 at 21:37

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