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I got this problem from an interview with Microsoft.

Given an array of random integers, write an algorithm in C that removes duplicated numbers and return the unique numbers in the original array.

E.g Input: {4, 8, 4, 1, 1, 2, 9} Output: {4, 8, 1, 2, 9, ?, ?}

One caveat is that the expected algorithm should not required the array to be sorted first. And when an element has been removed, the following elements must be shifted forward as well. Anyway, value of elements at the tail of the array where elements were shifted forward are negligible.

Update: The result must be returned in the original array and helper data structure (e.g. hashtable) should not be used. However, I guess order preservation is not necessary.

Update2: For those who wonder why these impractical constraints, this was an interview question and all these constraints are discussed during the thinking process to see how I can come up with different ideas.

share|improve this question
4  
Do you have to preserve the order of the unique numbers? – Douglas Leeder Oct 7 '09 at 16:55
1  
Does the result have to be returned in the original array? – Douglas Leeder Oct 7 '09 at 17:00
1  
I have updated the question. The result should be returned in the original array. However, the order of the sequence does not matter. – ejel Oct 7 '09 at 17:36
3  
It is pretty annoying when someone pimps their answer on the question and other answers. Just be patient, people will get there. – GManNickG Oct 7 '09 at 19:15
2  
Why isn't a hashtable allowed? That restriction makes no sense. – RBarryYoung Oct 7 '09 at 22:41

34 Answers 34

up vote 22 down vote accepted

How about:

void rmdup(int *array, int length)
{
    int *current , *end = array + length - 1;

    for ( current = array + 1; array < end; array++, current = array + 1 )
    {
        while ( current <= end )
        {
            if ( *current == *array )
            {
                *current = *end--;
            }
            else
            {
                current++;
            }
        }
    }
}

Should be O(n^2) or less.

share|improve this answer
3  
This is the simple solution and is more than likely what the interview question is looking for. – Kirk Broadhurst Oct 7 '09 at 23:08
6  
They might even be checking to see that you don't suffer from indulging in premature optimization unless they've given you runtime constraints too! :-) – Trevor Tippins Oct 7 '09 at 23:48
10  
Lol, though it's definately faster to sort the array and work on the sorted one. Sorting should be provided by an API and is imho no premature optimization. – ziggystar Nov 20 '09 at 12:14
3  
too few downvotes on this. – unkulunkulu Jun 26 '12 at 8:54
2  
Shouldn't it be while ( current <= end ) instead of while ( current < end )? – Shail Apr 19 '13 at 13:51

A solution suggested by my girlfriend is a variation of merge sort. The only modification is that during the merge step, just disregard duplicated values. This solution would be as well O(n log n). In this approach, the sorting/duplication removal are combined together. However, I'm not sure if that makes any difference, though.

share|improve this answer
6  
Great suggestion, but you'll need some bookkeeping to keep track of the end of each merge output. I actually did this once, and yes eliminating the duplicates as you merge makes it much faster. – Mark Ransom Oct 7 '09 at 18:28
372  
P.S. Marry that girl! – Mark Ransom Oct 7 '09 at 19:48
34  
The rep you earned from this answer doesn't belong to you. :P – GManNickG Oct 10 '09 at 16:14
3  
A paper that describes what your girlfriend suggested follows: dc-pubs.dbs.uni-leipzig.de/files/… – Mike B Sep 12 '14 at 19:06
3  
When people overly compliment female programmers...This is the exact reason we have so few... – turnt Feb 11 '15 at 7:14

I've posted this once before on SO, but I'll reproduce it here because it's pretty cool. It uses hashing, building something like a hash set in place. It's guaranteed to be O(1) in axillary space (the recursion is a tail call), and is typically O(N) time complexity. The algorithm is as follows:

  1. Take the first element of the array, this will be the sentinel.
  2. Reorder the rest of the array, as much as possible, such that each element is in the position corresponding to its hash. As this step is completed, duplicates will be discovered. Set them equal to sentinel.
  3. Move all elements for which the index is equal to the hash to the beginning of the array.
  4. Move all elements that are equal to sentinel, except the first element of the array, to the end of the array.
  5. What's left between the properly hashed elements and the duplicate elements will be the elements that couldn't be placed in the index corresponding to their hash because of a collision. Recurse to deal with these elements.

This can be shown to be O(N) provided no pathological scenario in the hashing: Even if there are no duplicates, approximately 2/3 of the elements will be eliminated at each recursion. Each level of recursion is O(n) where small n is the amount of elements left. The only problem is that, in practice, it's slower than a quick sort when there are few duplicates, i.e. lots of collisions. However, when there are huge amounts of duplicates, it's amazingly fast.

Edit: In current implementations of D, hash_t is 32 bits. Everything about this algorithm assumes that there will be very few, if any, hash collisions in full 32-bit space. Collisions may, however, occur frequently in the modulus space. However, this assumption will in all likelihood be true for any reasonably sized data set. If the key is less than or equal to 32 bits, it can be its own hash, meaning that a collision in full 32-bit space is impossible. If it is larger, you simply can't fit enough of them into 32-bit memory address space for it to be a problem. I assume hash_t will be increased to 64 bits in 64-bit implementations of D, where datasets can be larger. Furthermore, if this ever did prove to be a problem, one could change the hash function at each level of recursion.

Here's an implementation in the D programming language:

void uniqueInPlace(T)(ref T[] dataIn) {
    uniqueInPlaceImpl(dataIn, 0);
}

void uniqueInPlaceImpl(T)(ref T[] dataIn, size_t start) {
    if(dataIn.length - start < 2)
        return;

    invariant T sentinel = dataIn[start];
    T[] data = dataIn[start + 1..$];

    static hash_t getHash(T elem) {
        static if(is(T == uint) || is(T == int)) {
            return cast(hash_t) elem;
        } else static if(__traits(compiles, elem.toHash)) {
            return elem.toHash;
        } else {
            static auto ti = typeid(typeof(elem));
            return ti.getHash(&elem);
        }
    }

    for(size_t index = 0; index < data.length;) {
        if(data[index] == sentinel) {
            index++;
            continue;
        }

        auto hash = getHash(data[index]) % data.length;
        if(index == hash) {
            index++;
            continue;
        }

        if(data[index] == data[hash]) {
            data[index] = sentinel;
            index++;
            continue;
        }

        if(data[hash] == sentinel) {
            swap(data[hash], data[index]);
            index++;
            continue;
        }

        auto hashHash = getHash(data[hash]) % data.length;
        if(hashHash != hash) {
            swap(data[index], data[hash]);
            if(hash < index)
                index++;
        } else {
            index++;
        }
    }


    size_t swapPos = 0;
    foreach(i; 0..data.length) {
        if(data[i] != sentinel && i == getHash(data[i]) % data.length) {
            swap(data[i], data[swapPos++]);
        }
    }

    size_t sentinelPos = data.length;
    for(size_t i = swapPos; i < sentinelPos;) {
        if(data[i] == sentinel) {
            swap(data[i], data[--sentinelPos]);
        } else {
            i++;
        }
    }

    dataIn = dataIn[0..sentinelPos + start + 1];
    uniqueInPlaceImpl(dataIn, start + swapPos + 1);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Extremely cool, underrated answer! I like the idea of using the element in position 1 as a sentinel value. If I could make a couple of small suggestions, it would be to change step 2 to include "each element is in the position corresponding to its hash modulo the array size", and perhaps clarify that the duplicates to be set to the sentinel are the elements that have the same value (as opposed to the same hash, or the same hash modulo array size). – j_random_hacker Nov 20 '12 at 5:02
1  
Awesome answer. Deserves more upvotes. – Paul Hankin Oct 12 '13 at 9:53

If you are looking for the superior O-notation, then sorting the array with an O(n log n) sort then doing a O(n) traversal may be the best route. Without sorting, you are looking at O(n^2).

Edit: if you are just doing integers, then you can also do radix sort to get O(n).

share|improve this answer
    
Jeff B's answer is merely O(n). Hash-sets and hash-dictionaries are the bees knees. – ChrisW Oct 7 '09 at 17:07
2  
ChrisW: hash sets/dictionaries are only O(1) if you assume no collisions. (I'm not saying I wouldn't use them for this problem -- I probably would -- it's just a fallacy to claim that they're truly O(1).) – Laurence Gonsalves Oct 7 '09 at 17:36
2  
Actually, since you know the size of the array before-hand, you can guarantee O(1). Then you can trade off collisions vs how much additional memory you use. – Vitali Oct 7 '09 at 17:54
    
You might want to rethink that downvote - newly posted conditions to the problem make Jeff B's solution invalid. – Mark Ransom Oct 7 '09 at 18:13
3  
You might want to elaborate on "traversal", since a naive erasure method might result in O(n^2) for large numbers of duplicates. – Mark Ransom Oct 7 '09 at 18:15

One more efficient implementation

int i, j;

/* new length of modified array */
int NewLength = 1;

for(i=1; i< Length; i++){

   for(j=0; j< NewLength ; j++)
   {

      if(array[i] == array[j])
      break;
   }

   /* if none of the values in index[0..j] of array is not same as array[i],
      then copy the current value to corresponding new position in array */

  if (j==NewLength )
      array[NewLength++] = array[i];
}

In this implementation there is no need for sorting the array. Also if a duplicate element is found, there is no need for shifting all elements after this by one position.

The output of this code is array[] with size NewLength

Here we are starting from the 2nd elemt in array and comparing it with all the elements in array up to this array. We are holding an extra index variable 'NewLength' for modifying the input array. NewLength variabel is initialized to 0.

Element in array[1] will be compared with array[0]. If they are different, then value in array[NewLength] will be modified with array[1] and increment NewLength. If they are same, NewLength will not be modified.

So if we have an array [1 2 1 3 1], then

In First pass of 'j' loop, array[1] (2) will be compared with array0, then 2 will be written to array[NewLength] = array[1] so array will be [1 2] since NewLength = 2

In second pass of 'j' loop, array[2] (1) will be compared with array0 and array1. Here since array[2] (1) and array0 are same loop will break here. so array will be [1 2] since NewLength = 2

and so on

share|improve this answer
3  
Nice one. I have a suggestion to improve. Second nested loop can be changed to for(j=0; j < NewLength; j++) and last if checking can be changed to if (j == NewLength ) – Vadakkumpadath Oct 8 '09 at 10:14
    
That was a great suggession. I have updated the code based on ur comment – Byju Oct 8 '09 at 16:43
    
Fail at least if we have same values in array {1,1,1,1,1,1}. Useless code. – Yuriy Chernyshov Jun 27 '13 at 16:54
    
Well what is the complexity of this, isn't it also O(n^2)? – JavaSa Mar 26 '14 at 17:31
    
So many upvotes, but this isn't efficient: it's O(n^2) when there's few duplicates. – Paul Hankin Mar 13 '15 at 3:08

1. Using O(1) extra space, in O(n log n) time

This is possible, for instance:

  • first do an in-place O(n log n) sort
  • then walk through the list once, writing the first instance of every back to the beginning of the list

I believe ejel's partner is correct that the best way to do this would be an in-place merge sort with a simplified merge step, and that that is probably the intent of the question, if you were eg. writing a new library function to do this as efficiently as possible with no ability to improve the inputs, and there would be cases it would be useful to do so without a hash-table, depending on the sorts of inputs. But I haven't actually checked this.

2. Using O(lots) extra space, in O(n) time

  • declare a zero'd array big enough to hold all integers
  • walk through the array once
  • set the corresponding array element to 1 for each integer.
  • If it was already 1, skip that integer.

This only works if several questionable assumptions hold:

  • it's possible to zero memory cheaply, or the size of the ints are small compared to the number of them
  • you're happy to ask your OS for 256^sizepof(int) memory
  • and it will cache it for you really really efficiently if it's gigantic

It's a bad answer, but if you have LOTS of input elements, but they're all 8-bit integers (or maybe even 16-bit integers) it could be the best way.

3. O(little)-ish extra space, O(n)-ish time

As #2, but use a hash table.

4. The clear way

If the number of elements is small, writing an appropriate algorithm is not useful if other code is quicker to write and quicker to read.

Eg. Walk through the array for each unique elements (ie. the first element, the second element (duplicates of the first having been removed) etc) removing all identical elements. O(1) extra space, O(n^2) time.

Eg. Use library functions which do this. efficiency depends which you have easily available.

share|improve this answer

Well, it's basic implementation is quite simple. Go through all elements, check whether there are duplicates in the remaining ones and shift the rest over them.

It's terrible inefficient and you could speed it up by a helper-array for the output or sorting/binary trees, but this doesn't seem to be allowed.

share|improve this answer
1  
OTOH, the additional code required to implement a sorting tree might be less (memory) efficient than the simple solution, and is probably less efficient at run-time for small (say fewer than 100 elements) arrays. – TMN Jun 10 '10 at 13:12

You could do this in a single traversal, if you are willing to sacrifice memory. You can simply tally whether you have seen an integer or not in a hash/associative array. If you have already seen a number, remove it as you go, or better yet, move numbers you have not seen into a new array, avoiding any shifting in the original array.

In Perl:

foreach $i (@myary) {
    if(!defined $seen{$i}) {
        $seen{$i} = 1;
        push @newary, $i;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It's not clear if the answer has to be in the original array. – Douglas Leeder Oct 7 '09 at 16:59
    
To do this without requiring a new array, you could simply replace the duplicate with an element popped off the end of the array, and redo the current loop, as the problem does not specify that order matters. This requires some extra bounds checking, but is very do-able. – Jeff B Oct 7 '09 at 17:09
6  
This was a good idea, until the question was edited. Your hashtable idea is apparently against the rules. – WCWedin Oct 7 '09 at 18:57
14  
I don't get why this answer gets voted the most. It's written in perl and uses vital features not available in C, as the question asks. – LiraNuna Oct 7 '09 at 19:31
5  
the question asked for c code, not perl. using perl gets you hashtables and "push" for free. If i could do it in scala you would just call input.removeDuplicates, but i doubt that would have been acceptable to the interviewers :) – Peter Recore Oct 8 '09 at 17:15

If you are allowed to use C++, a call to std::sort followed by a call to std::unique will give you the answer. The time complexity is O(N log N) for the sort and O(N) for the unique traversal.

And if C++ is off the table there isn't anything that keeps these same algorithms from being written in C.

share|improve this answer
    
"One caveat is that the expected algorithm should not required the array to be sorted first." – sbi Oct 7 '09 at 17:30
2  
It doesn't say you can't sort the array once you get it... Without using O(N) external memory sorting is the only way to do it in O(N log N) or better. – Greg Rogers Oct 7 '09 at 17:45
    
For the purpose of the problem, standard library utils should not be used. Regarding sorting, however, the more I think of it, the more unsure I am whether it is ok or not. – ejel Oct 7 '09 at 17:55
    
I think answers refering to C++ and C++ standard functions are useful, even if they don't answer the original question, as they provide a more rounded answer to people who find this question later. – Douglas Leeder Oct 7 '09 at 21:46

The return value of the function should be the number of unique elements and they are all stored at the front of the array. Without this additional information, you won't even know if there were any duplicates.

Each iteration of the outer loop processes one element of the array. If it is unique, it stays in the front of the array and if it is a duplicate, it is overwritten by the last unprocessed element in the array. This solution runs in O(n^2) time.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

size_t rmdup(int *arr, size_t len)
{
  size_t prev = 0;
  size_t curr = 1;
  size_t last = len - 1;
  while (curr <= last) {
    for (prev = 0; prev < curr && arr[curr] != arr[prev]; ++prev);
    if (prev == curr) {
      ++curr;
    } else {
      arr[curr] = arr[last];
      --last;
    }
  }
  return curr;
}

void print_array(int *arr, size_t len)
{
  printf("{");
  size_t curr = 0;
  for (curr = 0; curr < len; ++curr) {
    if (curr > 0) printf(", ");
    printf("%d", arr[curr]);
  }
  printf("}");
}

int main()
{
  int arr[] = {4, 8, 4, 1, 1, 2, 9};
  printf("Before: ");
  size_t len = sizeof (arr) / sizeof (arr[0]);
  print_array(arr, len);
  len = rmdup(arr, len);
  printf("\nAfter: ");
  print_array(arr, len);
  printf("\n");
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

An array should obviously be "traversed" right-to-left to avoid unneccessary copying of values back and forth.

If you have unlimited memory, you can allocate a bit array for sizeof(type-of-element-in-array) / 8 bytes to have each bit signify whether you've already encountered corresponding value or not.

If you don't, I can't think of anything better than traversing an array and comparing each value with values that follow it and then if duplicate is found, remove these values altogether. This is somewhere near O(n^2) (or O((n^2-n)/2)).

IBM has an article on kinda close subject.

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed - an O(n) pass to find the largest element wouldn't increase the overall O() cost. – Douglas Leeder Oct 7 '09 at 16:56

Let's see:

  • O(N) pass to find min/max allocate
  • bit-array for found
  • O(N) pass swapping duplicates to end.
share|improve this answer
    
Given that they're only integers, for simplicity you could assume 32bit and not bother looking for min/max: 2^32 bits is "only" 512MB, so finding the bounds is just a memory-use and O(1) time optimisation (granted, a hefty optimisation in the case of the example given). And if they're 64bit, it's irrelevant since you don't know that the min and max won't be further apart than the number of bits of memory you have. – Steve Jessop Oct 7 '09 at 18:14
    
Theory aside, wouldn't allocating 512MB take more time than finding the min/max? – LiraNuna Oct 7 '09 at 21:14
    
Depends how much data there is, and what the min/max are. If you're looking at more than 512MB of input, then quite possibly it's faster to avoid that extra O(N) pass. Of course if you're looking at that much input, then it's less likely you have 512MB to spare. In cases where the min/max are close to 0/INT_MAX, then the optimisation doesn't help either. I'm just saying that although the first step obviously helps for small numbers, it can't avoid the fact that this algorithm uses UINT_MAX bits in the worst case, so you need to plan for that limitation. – Steve Jessop Oct 7 '09 at 21:35
    
You may well be right - in any case clarification of the question means that using a bit-array is out. I'll leave this answer in case someone comes along later without the constraints and wants to view all possible answers. – Douglas Leeder Oct 7 '09 at 21:45

Here is a Java Version.

int[] removeDuplicate(int[] input){

        int arrayLen = input.length;
        for(int i=0;i<arrayLen;i++){
            for(int j = i+1; j< arrayLen ; j++){
                if(((input[i]^input[j]) == 0)){
                    input[j] = 0;
                }
                if((input[j]==0) && j<arrayLen-1){
                        input[j] = input[j+1];
                        input[j+1] = 0;
                    }               
            }
        }       
        return input;       
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Fails at least with next inputs: {1,1,1,1,1,1,1} {0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1} – Yuriy Chernyshov Jun 27 '13 at 17:06

In Java I would solve it like this. Don't know how to write this in C.

   int length = array.length;
   for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) 
   {
      for (int j = i + 1; j < length; j++) 
      {
         if (array[i] == array[j]) 
         {
            int k, j;
            for (k = j + 1, l = j; k < length; k++, l++) 
            {
               if (array[k] != array[i]) 
               {
                  array[l] = array[k];
               }
               else
               {
                  l--;
               }
            }
            length = l;
         }
      }
   }
share|improve this answer
    
If you overwrite the duplicates you find with the value at the end of the array you can avoid the shifting of the whole array in your inner for() loop. That will bring you to O(n^2) from O(n^3). My C implementation is floating around here somewhere... – mocj Oct 7 '09 at 19:41
    
I thought, shifting was part of the requirement, but you are right of course. – Dominik Oct 7 '09 at 19:48
1  
@mocj: I like your solution, looks very elegant. But I think it doesn't work if the last two elements are equal, because you stop checking for equality one before the last. (comenting here because have too view reputation to comment anywhere else :( ) – Dominik Oct 7 '09 at 20:33
    
You're right except that the original problem states that the values at the end of the array are negligible. Since you aren't returning the length of the modified array the distinction between the last value and the second to last is unimportant when the two values are equal. Where does the caller interpret the end of the returned array to be – mocj Oct 7 '09 at 21:13

This can be done in one pass with an O(N log N) algorithm and no extra storage.

Proceed from element a[1] to a[N]. At each stage i, all of the elements to the left of a[i] comprise a sorted heap of elements a[0] through a[j]. Meanwhile, a second index j, initially 0, keeps track of the size of the heap.

Examine a[i] and insert it into the heap, which now occupies elements a[0] to a[j+1]. As the element is inserted, if a duplicate element a[k] is encountered having the same value, do not insert a[i] into the heap (i.e., discard it); otherwise insert it into the heap, which now grows by one element and now comprises a[0] to a[j+1], and increment j.

Continue in this manner, incrementing i until all of the array elements have been examined and inserted into the heap, which ends up occupying a[0] to a[j]. j is the index of the last element of the heap, and the heap contains only unique element values.

int algorithm(int[] a, int n)
{
    int   i, j;  

    for (j = 0, i = 1;  i < n;  i++)
    {
        // Insert a[i] into the heap a[0...j]
        if (heapInsert(a, j, a[i]))
            j++;
    }
    return j;
}  

bool heapInsert(a[], int n, int val)
{
    // Insert val into heap a[0...n]
    ...code omitted for brevity...
    if (duplicate element a[k] == val)
        return false;
    a[k] = val;
    return true;
}

Looking at the example, this is not exactly what was asked for since the resulting array preserves the original element order. But if this requirement is relaxed, the algorithm above should do the trick.

share|improve this answer

How about the following?

int* temp = malloc(sizeof(int)*len);
int count = 0;
int x =0;
int y =0;
for(x=0;x<len;x++)
{
    for(y=0;y<count;y++)
    {
        if(*(temp+y)==*(array+x))
        {
            break;
        }
    }
    if(y==count)
    {
        *(temp+count) = *(array+x);
        count++;
    }
}
memcpy(array, temp, sizeof(int)*len);

I try to declare a temp array and put the elements into that before copying everything back to the original array.

share|improve this answer

After review the problem, here is my delphi way, that may help

var
A: Array of Integer;
I,J,C,K, P: Integer;
begin
C:=10;
SetLength(A,10);
A[0]:=1; A[1]:=4; A[2]:=2; A[3]:=6; A[4]:=3; A[5]:=4;
A[6]:=3; A[7]:=4; A[8]:=2; A[9]:=5;

for I := 0 to C-1 do
begin
  for J := I+1 to C-1 do
    if A[I]=A[J] then
    begin
      for K := C-1 Downto J do
        if A[J]<>A[k] then
        begin
          P:=A[K];
          A[K]:=0;
          A[J]:=P;
          C:=K;
          break;
        end
        else
        begin
          A[K]:=0;
          C:=K;
        end;
    end;
end;

//tructate array
setlength(A,C);
end;
share|improve this answer

The following example should solve your problem:

def check_dump(x):
   if not x in t:
      t.append(x)
      return True

t=[]

output = filter(check_dump, input)

print(output)
True
share|improve this answer

Here is my solution.

///// find duplicates in an array and remove them

void unique(int* input, int n)
{
     merge_sort(input, 0, n) ;

     int prev = 0  ;

     for(int i = 1 ; i < n ; i++)
     {
          if(input[i] != input[prev])
               if(prev < i-1)
                   input[prev++] = input[i] ;                         
     }
}
share|improve this answer
import java.util.ArrayList;


public class C {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        int arr[] = {2,5,5,5,9,11,11,23,34,34,34,45,45};

        ArrayList<Integer> arr1 = new ArrayList<Integer>();

        for(int i=0;i<arr.length-1;i++){

            if(arr[i] == arr[i+1]){
                arr[i] = 99999;
            }
        }

        for(int i=0;i<arr.length;i++){
            if(arr[i] != 99999){

                arr1.add(arr[i]);
            }
        }

        System.out.println(arr1);
}
    }
share|improve this answer
    
arr[i+1] should throw ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException for the last element? – Sathesh Jun 9 '15 at 22:45

This can be done in a single pass, in O(N) time in the number of integers in the input list, and O(N) storage in the number of unique integers.

Walk through the list from front to back, with two pointers "dst" and "src" initialized to the first item. Start with an empty hash table of "integers seen". If the integer at src is not present in the hash, write it to the slot at dst and increment dst. Add the integer at src to the hash, then increment src. Repeat until src passes the end of the input list.

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2  
In the modification to the original question, hash tables aren't allowed. Your two pointer approach is a nice way to compact the output once you've identified the duplicates, though. – Mark Ransom Oct 7 '09 at 19:14

Insert all the elements in a binary tree the disregards duplicates - O(nlog(n)). Then extract all of them back in the array by doing a traversal - O(n). I am assuming that you don't need order preservation.

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Use bloom filter for hashing. This will reduce the memory overhead very significantly.

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care to elaborate or provide a reference? – dldnh Apr 3 '12 at 10:43

In JAVA,

    Integer[] arrayInteger = {1,2,3,4,3,2,4,6,7,8,9,9,10};

    String value ="";

    for(Integer i:arrayInteger)
    {
        if(!value.contains(Integer.toString(i))){
            value +=Integer.toString(i)+",";
        }

    }

    String[] arraySplitToString = value.split(",");
    Integer[] arrayIntResult = new Integer[arraySplitToString.length];
    for(int i = 0 ; i < arraySplitToString.length ; i++){
        arrayIntResult[i] = Integer.parseInt(arraySplitToString[i]);
    }

output: { 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}

hope this will help

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1  
Test this with the input arrayInteger = {100,10,1}; – Blastfurnace Jun 23 '12 at 15:59

This is the naive (N*(N-1)/2) solution. It uses constant additional space and maintains the original order. It is similar to the solution by @Byju, but uses no if(){} blocks. It also avoids copying an element onto itself.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int numbers[] = {4, 8, 4, 1, 1, 2, 9};
#define COUNT (sizeof numbers / sizeof numbers[0])

size_t undup_it(int array[], size_t len)
{
size_t src,dst;

  /* an array of size=1 cannot contain duplicate values */
if (len <2) return len; 
  /* an array of size>1 will cannot at least one unique value */
for (src=dst=1; src < len; src++) {
        size_t cur;
        for (cur=0; cur < dst; cur++ ) {
                if (array[cur] == array[src]) break;
                }
        if (cur != dst) continue; /* found a duplicate */

                /* array[src] must be new: add it to the list of non-duplicates */
        if (dst < src) array[dst] = array[src]; /* avoid copy-to-self */
        dst++;
        }
return dst; /* number of valid alements in new array */
}

void print_it(int array[], size_t len)
{
size_t idx;

for (idx=0; idx < len; idx++)  {
        printf("%c %d", (idx) ? ',' :'{' , array[idx] );
        }
printf("}\n" );
}

int main(void) {    
    size_t cnt = COUNT;

    printf("Before undup:" );    
    print_it(numbers, cnt);    

    cnt = undup_it(numbers,cnt);

    printf("After undup:" );    
    print_it(numbers, cnt);

    return 0;
}
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First, you should create an array check[n] where n is the number of elements of the array you want to make duplicate-free and set the value of every element(of the check array) equal to 1. Using a for loop traverse the array with the duplicates, say its name is arr, and in the for-loop write this :

{
    if (check[arr[i]] != 1) {
        arr[i] = 0;
    }
    else {
        check[arr[i]] = 0;
    }
}

With that, you set every duplicate equal to zero. So the only thing is left to do is to traverse the arr array and print everything it's not equal to zero. The order stays and it takes linear time (3*n).

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The question does not allow extra data structure to be used. – ejel Jul 7 '14 at 19:56

Given an array of n elements, write an algorithm to remove all duplicates from the array in time O(nlogn)

Algorithm delete_duplicates (a[1....n])
//Remove duplicates from the given array 
//input parameters :a[1:n], an array of n elements.

{

temp[1:n]; //an array of n elements. 

temp[i]=a[i];for i=1 to n

 temp[i].value=a[i]

temp[i].key=i

 //based on 'value' sort the array temp.

//based on 'value' delete duplicate elements from temp.

//based on 'key' sort the array temp.//construct an array p using temp.

 p[i]=temp[i]value

  return p.

In other of elements is maintained in the output array using the 'key'. Consider the key is of length O(n), the time taken for performing sorting on the key and value is O(nlogn). So the time taken to delete all duplicates from the array is O(nlogn).

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For all the bold glyphs, what did you make of helper data structure (e.g. hashtable) should not be used? – greybeard Mar 13 '15 at 12:09
    
Not necessarily needed. I just highlighted those for the purpose of understanding. – Sharief Muzammil Mar 13 '15 at 12:15

this is what i've got, though it misplaces the order we can sort in ascending or descending to fix it up.

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void){
int x,n,myvar=0;
printf("Enter a number: \t");
scanf("%d",&n);
int arr[n],changedarr[n];

for(x=0;x<n;x++){
    printf("Enter a number for array[%d]: ",x);
    scanf("%d",&arr[x]);
}
printf("\nOriginal Number in an array\n");
for(x=0;x<n;x++){
    printf("%d\t",arr[x]);
}

int i=0,j=0;
// printf("i\tj\tarr\tchanged\n");

for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
{
    // printf("%d\t%d\t%d\t%d\n",i,j,arr[i],changedarr[i] );
    for (int j = 0; j <n; j++)
    {   
        if (i==j)
        {
            continue;

        }
        else if(arr[i]==arr[j]){
            changedarr[j]=0;

        }
        else{
            changedarr[i]=arr[i];

        }
    // printf("%d\t%d\t%d\t%d\n",i,j,arr[i],changedarr[i] );
    }
    myvar+=1;
}
// printf("\n\nmyvar=%d\n",myvar);
int count=0;
printf("\nThe unique items:\n");
for (int i = 0; i < myvar; i++)
{
        if(changedarr[i]!=0){
            count+=1;
            printf("%d\t",changedarr[i]);   
        }
}
    printf("\n");
}
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It'd be cool if you had a good DataStructure that could quickly tell if it contains an integer. Perhaps a tree of some sort.

DataStructure elementsSeen = new DataStructure();
int elementsRemoved = 0;
for(int i=0;i<array.Length;i++){
  if(elementsSeen.Contains(array[i])
    elementsRemoved++;
  else
    array[i-elementsRemoved] = array[i];
}
array.Length = array.Length - elementsRemoved;
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