Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Live js-Fiddle Demo Link: http://jsfiddle.net/ivandude/r2UgV/1/

As you can see the page works by being split into 4 slides, and they open on Click of the slide. The simple function of moving mouse over the areas, and clicking one to open the slide full works thus far, all fine.

The Problem is unfortunately trying to navigate Forward (click next button) when one of these slides are in full-view. [Please See Slide 1 (Click Open) and Click > Arrow]. I just want to be able to figure a way to navigate to the next slide. My logical thinking was to just assign a jQuery Click event to my unique ID arrow button, and tell page-1 to shut while page-2 opens after it <--- this did not work however.

For easy editing and use I have prepared a jQuery above that has been commented. I think it is best to review the page and its affected areas below, but thank you very much if you are reading and able to help me out :) I have tried to make it as easy as possible with the JS Fiddle and the explanation below.


In order of execution:

  1. On page load > Each page (one of the 4 slides) is set via CSS width:25%. They get their heights to fill the browser window dynamically, but not important here.

  2. On body load > The percentages have worked their magic and now the jQuery turns those % into variable data via jQuery.

    $("#page-1, #page-2, #page-3, #page-4").each(function() {
    $(this).data("standardWidth", $(this).width());
    });
    

    They are later used for the hover effect that enlarges (gives preview) to the slide. (Move your mouse around without clicking yet for e.g.)

  3. When the mouse hovers a slide, this happens:

    $("#page-1, #page-2, #page-3, #page-4").mouseenter(function() {
    
    $(this).parent().children().not(this).animate({
        opacity: 0.5,
        width: (($(this).data("standardWidth") - 34)+'px')
    }, 250 );
    
    $(this).animate({
        opacity: 1,
        width: (($(this).data("standardWidth") + 100)+'px')
    }, 250 );
    
    });
    

    There is no mouseleave event.

  4. When the slide is clicked this happens:

    $("#page-1, #page-2, #page-3, #page-4").click(function() {
    
    $(this).parent().children().not(this).animate({
        opacity: 0,
        width: ((0)+'px')
    }, 300 );
    
    $(this).animate({
        opacity: 1,
        width: $(document).width()
    }, 300 );
    
    });
    
  5. And of course here is my unique button that I am trying to make upon click, Page 1 will collapse (width of 0?), Page 2 expands (width 100%?), and in some kind of workable jquery code so I can assign custom functions per each button :)

    $("#s1-arrow-r").click(function() {
    
    $("#page-1, #page-3, #page-4").parent().children().stop().animate({
        opacity: 0,
        width: ((0)+'px')
    }, 300 );
    
    $("#page-2").stop().animate({
        opacity: 1,
        width: $(document).width()
    }, 300 );
    
    })
    

I have no problem making unique IDs for every manual next button, as this micro site will not have more than 4 slides and it is also in the process of some manual learning myself.

share|improve this question
    
should be using common classes for your elements and not thinking in terms of unique ID's for everything like buttons, pages etc. Learn some simple traverse methods like next() and prev(). Would remove about 2/3 of your code switching to classes. Also index() would be helpful in combination with eq(). –  charlietfl Mar 11 '13 at 0:41
    
Thanks for the reply. I understand what you are saying but I am doing this exercise to learn more about the processes, and as a stepping stone before going onto traverse methods and less unique ids everywhere. For this exercise sake though I am really looking for a way to just progress the slides manually. At the moment I am still hitting my head trying to figure it to hide slide 1 + bring in slide 2. So far no luck :) –  Ivandude Mar 11 '13 at 23:23
    
you are hitting your head for exactly the same reasons I made the suggestion. Can greatly simplify the code and thinking involved using classes –  charlietfl Mar 11 '13 at 23:32
    
Its one thing to say it can be greatly simplified, of course it can. But I am admitting I do not have the know-how or directions on where to start learning such things. For time being - of manually switching through pages, I just needed a 'RETURN FALSE;' featured after my code... I figured out its behaviour and realised I could use this. –  Ivandude Mar 11 '13 at 23:48
    
here's a quickly thrown together demo that with just a few lines of code manages switching pages as an example jsfiddle.net/ACu8W. No ID's used, and just some simple traverses. The jQuery API has excellen examples for all the methods –  charlietfl Mar 11 '13 at 23:48

1 Answer 1

RETURN FALSE;

has been used to solve this problem. The slide kept reverting back to its original state and this helps in the .click(function() before it is closed off. Contact me for more details if needed...

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.