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I have two questions. I have a folder which contains subfolders containing .txt files. The txt files are of the format

{title.of.a.book}.V{4 digit year}.{4 digit issue}.txt

example

to.kill.a.mockingbird.V1960.0001.txt

I want to pull out three pieces of information:

  1. title (with spaces instead of periods) eg: to kill a mockingbird
  2. volume number eg: 1960
  3. issue number eg: 0001

This is what I've written so far

for file in $(find /home/user/books -type f -name '*.txt')
do
    name=$(echo "$file"|sed -e 's/^\(.*\).V.*txt$/\1/')
    volume=$(echo "$file"|sed -e 's/^.*V\(\d{4}\).*$/\1/')
    issue=$(echo "$file"|sed -e 's/^.*\(\d{4}\).txt$/\1/')
    echo "$name" "$volume" "$issue"
done
  1. How to pull out the 3 pieces of info to separate variables
  2. How to replace the . with spaces

I can't decide whether to rename the file first (rename s/./ /g) - or to rename the $name afterwards.

The name variable prints correctly, but the volume and issue number variables just print the filename out...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The solution by speakr is probably best, but I am still old-school and like sed.

You can supply multiple commands to sed in a single -e argument, separated by semicolons, or in multiple -e arguments; I more usually use the latter. I'd also clean up the name from find to remove the leading path. Then you need to decide whether you're using extended regular expressions of not, and you need to be consistent in what you use.

Using GNU sed 4.4.2 (©2012), I can't get the \d notation to recognize digits; there's probably something silly here.

Without extended regular expressions (will work with non-GNU versions of sed):

for file in $(find /home/user/books -type f -name '*.txt')
do
    base=$(basename $file .txt)
    name=$(  echo "$base" | sed -e 's/^\(.*\).V.*$/\1/' -e 's/\./ /g') # replace dots
    volume=$(echo "$base" | sed -e 's/^.*V\([0-9]\{4\}\).*$/\1/')
    issue=$( echo "$base" | sed -e 's/^.*\([0-9]\{4\}\)$/\1/')
    echo "$name" "$volume" "$issue"
done

Output for the example book:

to kill a mockingbird 1960 0001

Using GNU sed's 'extended regular expression' mode (-r):

for file in $(find /home/user/books -type f -name '*.txt')
do
    base=$(basename $file .txt)
    name=$(  echo "$base" | sed -r -e 's/^(.*).V.*$/\1/' -e 's/\./ /g') # replace dots
    volume=$(echo "$base" | sed -r -e 's/^.*V([0-9]{4}).*$/\1/')
    issue=$( echo "$base" | sed -r -e 's/^.*([0-9]{4})$/\1/')
    echo "$name" "$volume" "$issue"
done

Using the \d notation (incorrect output):

for file in $(find /home/user/books -type f -name '*.txt')
do
    base=$(basename $file .txt)
    name=$(  echo "$base" | sed -r -e 's/^(.*).V.*$/\1/' -e 's/\./ /g') # replace dots
    volume=$(echo "$base" | sed -r -e 's/^.*V(\d{4}).*$/\1/')
    issue=$( echo "$base" | sed -r -e 's/^.*(\d{4})$/\1/')
    echo "$name" "$volume" "$issue"
done

Output:

to kill a mockingbird to.kill.a.mockingbird.V1960.0001 to.kill.a.mockingbird.V1960.0001
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This also works - thank you for all the help! Would also vote up for this but I don't have enough reputation!! –  King Ethelfrith Mar 11 '13 at 7:23

No need to use sed, bash can handle it with param expansions.

Assuming that all your text files use the mentioned format:

#!/bin/bash
for file in $(find /home/user/books -type f -name '*.txt'); do
    pre=${file%%.txt}
    pre=${pre//./ }
    name=${pre%% V*}
    volume=${pre##* V}
    volume=${volume%% *}
    issue=${pre##* }
    echo "Name: '$name' Volume: '$volume' Issue: '$issue'"
done
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This works, thank you! - I wanted to vote up but it won't let me!! –  King Ethelfrith Mar 11 '13 at 7:21

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