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Here is a piece of text I found at this link.

"Avoid lock on static methods

The worst solution is to put the "synchronized" keywords on the static methods, which means it will lock on all instances of this class."

Why would synchronizing a static method lock all instances of the class? Shouldn't it just lock the Class?

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5  
Since static methods are available to all instances, it locks all instances. –  duffymo Mar 11 '13 at 1:07
    
Although static methods are available to instances, they shouldn't be accessed via instances. They should only be accessed statically. So what the author says still isn't right. –  sotn Mar 11 '13 at 1:43
1  
@duffymo No, it doesn't lock any instances. 'synchronized(this)' would proceed during this lock. –  EJP Mar 11 '13 at 1:51
1  
The dangers of quoting out of context. Reading through the whole text it becomes very clear that the author is talking about what happens when multiple threads try to access the same static synchronized method. The POV is not the object instances, its the threads. –  Perception Mar 11 '13 at 2:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's my test code that shows that you're right and the article is a bit over-cautious:

class Y {
    static synchronized void staticSleep() {
        System.out.println("Start static sleep");
        try {
            Thread.sleep(2000);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        }
        System.out.println("End static sleep");
    }

    synchronized void instanceSleep() {
        System.out.println("Start instance sleep");
        try {
            Thread.sleep(200);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        }
        System.out.println("End instance sleep");
    }
}

public class X {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        for (int i = 0; i < 2; ++i) {
            new Thread(new Runnable() {

                public void run() {
                    Y.staticSleep();
                }
            }).start();
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
            new Thread(new Runnable() {

                public void run() {
                    new Y().instanceSleep();
                }
            }).start();
        }
    }
}

Prints:

Start instance sleep
Start instance sleep
Start instance sleep
Start instance sleep
Start instance sleep
Start static sleep
Start instance sleep
Start instance sleep
Start instance sleep
Start instance sleep
Start instance sleep
End instance sleep
End instance sleep
End instance sleep
End instance sleep
End instance sleep
End instance sleep
End instance sleep
End instance sleep
End instance sleep
End instance sleep
End static sleep
Start static sleep
End static sleep

So the static synchronized has no bearing on the synchronized methods on the instances...

Of course if static synchronised methods are used throughout the system, then you can expect them to have the most impact on the throughput of a multithreaded systems, so use them at your peril...

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1  
Thanks for the test code! Even being over-cautious shouldn't make what the author says right. Instance and class locks are separate. The article had me doubting the hallowed SCJP, especially since the author, from his CV, is an expert. –  sotn Mar 11 '13 at 1:36

To understand this, the easiest way is to compare how lock works against instance method and static method. Let's say you have class Test.java, which has two methods as follow.

public class Test{
   public synchronized void instanceMethod(){
   }

   public synchronized static void staticMethod(){
   } 
}

Meanwhile, there are two instances of class Test, testA and testB. And also there are two thread tA and tB trying to access class Test in parallel.

locking on instanceMethod: When tA gets the lock on instanceMethod of testA, tB cannot access the the same method in testA, however tB is still free to invoke instanceMethod in testB. Because the synchronization against instanceMethod is instance level locking

locking on staticMethod: However, when tA gets the lock on staticMethod, the lock has nothing to do with testA or testB, since synchronization on static method is a class level locking. Which means tB cannot access staticMethod at all until tA release the lock

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Very good explanation of the difference in locking mechanisms. –  asgs Mar 11 '13 at 2:17
    
Finally got the idea about static synchronized method. Nice explanation. –  sonia May 8 '14 at 11:23
    
Yeah this is a pretty good summary of the locking instance vs static methods. –  JohnMerlino Jun 30 '14 at 20:38
    
I'm not sure I like this explanation. You are saying "tA gets the lock on instanceMethod of testA" which isn't true to my knowledge. Shouldn't it be that tA obtains the lock on the instance testA. It doesn't lock on a method of an instance. –  searchengine27 Feb 18 at 14:52
    
Seems the 2 methods are the same, so i would probably edit the last sentence of the last paragraph. I would write: "Which means tB cannot access any methods until tA release the lock" –  Aerox May 26 at 9:44

Actually a lock on a static method of class Foo, is the same as putting a lock on Foo.class (which is the only instance):

public static void doSomething()
{
    synchronized(Foo.class)
    {
        // ...
    }
}
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You are right — the actual lock is on the Class instance itself, not on any instance of the class (let alone all instances) — but I think you're interpreting the linked page too literally. It itself uses the phrase "a static lock (a Class lock)", so clearly its author is aware of how the locking works. But if you have many instances in different threads that are all using synchronized static methods, then those instances will all lock each other out. The synchronized static methods won't cause blocking of synchronized instance methods, but the problem is there regardless.

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It doesn't say 'lock all instances of the class'. It says 'lock on all instances of the class. It's poorly worded, indeed incorrect, but it doesn't it say what you said it said.

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