Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a ploblem about circular template reference. I want to make a tree using class node and class edge as following;

template <typename EdgeT>
class node
{
public:
    std::vector<EdgeT> edge_out;
    std::vector<EdgeT> edge_in;
};


template <typename NodeT>
class edge
{
public:
    NodeT* src;
    NodeT* dst;
    int weight;
};


template <typename NodeT, typename EdgeT>
class graph
{
public:
    std::vector<NodeT> nodes;
};

I found that I cannot declare graph class ex:

graph< node, edge > g; // <--- this cannot be solved 

graph< node< edge <node.....>, edge< node< edge>>  >  //it makes infinity declaration..

How can I redefine the structure of the classes?

share|improve this question
    
Does it have to be templated? –  Xymostech Mar 11 '13 at 1:59
    
"edge" and "node" class there should be the base classes. I plan to reuse them. ex an inherited edge can contain "flow" "reverse_flow" .... or an inherited "node" class can has more data such as flag, ..etc... so thats why i make them as templates –  MooMoo Mar 11 '13 at 2:05
    
this isn't making any sense to me... how can a node hold an edge with a source and a destination? Isn't the source always the node itself? It should be holding a list of nodes... –  Mehrdad Mar 11 '13 at 2:57
    
I treat "edge" as a pipe. when you pick up an edge, you should know where it is link to (pointer to node). And "node" as the container of "edges". –  MooMoo Mar 11 '13 at 4:59

2 Answers 2

Here is one approach:

#include <vector>

template<template<typename NodeT,typename T>class EdgeT, typename T=double>
struct Node {
   typedef Node<EdgeT,T> self_type;
   typedef EdgeT<self_type, T> edge_type;
   std::vector<edge_type> edge_out;
   std::vector<edge_type> edge_in;
   T data;
};

template<typename NodeT,typename T>
struct Edge {
   typedef NodeT node_type;
   node_type* src;
   node_type* dst;
   int weight;
};

template<typename NodeT, typename EdgeT=typename NodeT::edge_type>
struct graph {
   typedef NodeT node_type;
   typedef EdgeT edge_type;
   std::vector<NodeT> nodes;
};

int main() {
   typedef graph< Node<Edge> > graph_type;
   graph_type my_graph;
   my_graph.nodes.push_back( graph_type::node_type() );
   my_graph.nodes.push_back( graph_type::node_type() );
   my_graph.nodes.front().edge_out.push_back( {&my_graph.nodes[0], &my_graph.nodes[1], 1} );
   my_graph.nodes.back().edge_in.push_back( {&my_graph.nodes[0], &my_graph.nodes[1], 1} );
}

for another approach, you could look at how boost::variant handles recursive variants.

Another way to approach this would be more formal. C++ template metaprogramming is a functional language -- there are various techniques from functional programming in order to describe recursive structures without forward declaration that can be used.

I'm betting a fixed point combinator of some kind might work, but it is beyond me to figure out how. :)

share|improve this answer

You need to figure out the reason why you need to use templates. If for example you want to have the data dynamic in an edge, you could use:

//foward declaration
template <typename T>
class node
{
std::vector<Edge<T> > edge_out;
std::vector<Edge<T> > edge_in; 
} 


template <typename T>
class edge
{
Node<T>* src;
Node<T>* dst;
T    weight
}


template <typename T>
class graph
{
std::vector<Node<T> > nodes;
}

Likewise if you want to have data that differs in your node. But in general it is better to figure out the reason for templates beforehand. I have looked at overly templatized production code and it is quite unmaintainable.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.