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I am programming using the AT&T notation on the i386 architecture.

Is it possible to add two 8-bit numbers in order to set the Carry, Overflow, and Sign Flags to be set.

I am thinking it is impossible to get this flag combination. In order for the S-flag to be set together with the O-flag, the most significant bits of both numbers would have to be 0 and the most significant bit of the result would have to be 1. That leaves us with no way to generate a carry from the addition of the most significant bits.

This is my first time asking a question on this site, so I apologize if I did anything wrong. Thanks in advance.

EDIT: I can ONLY use the following three instructions:

movb $_, %ah

movb $_,%al

addb %ah,%al

I have to modify the two underscores with decimal values.

EDIT: Out of CF, OF, SF, and ZF, I can only have CF, OF, and SF set. I cannot have the Carry Flag set.

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I'm sure it can be hacked without addition. –  Linuxios Mar 11 '13 at 2:11
    
It's for a homework assignment so that won't work? Haha! –  Shan Mar 11 '13 at 2:12
    
I see. I'll think on this. –  Linuxios Mar 11 '13 at 2:12
2  
The combination of CF=SF=OF=1 is impossible to achieve from adding any two bytes. –  Alexey Frunze Mar 11 '13 at 3:18
1  
People vote down should state the reason in the comment. –  WiSaGaN Mar 11 '13 at 3:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is impossible to set CF=SF=OF=1 with add ah, al. A formal proof is going to be somewhat lengthy, but a simple exhaustive test confirms the impossibility of such a combination of flag states after an add instruction.


You can use POPF(D) to set an arbitrary combination of arithmetic flags. This instruction will pop a (d)word from the stack and write it into (E)FLAGS.

Note that there are other, unrelated to arithmetic, flags in the flags register. You shouldn't generally modify them. So, you'd typically first read the value of the register (using PUSHF(D)), modify that as necessary and then write back as outlined above.

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sahf doesn't modify OF, so it needs to be set separately. –  nrz Mar 11 '13 at 2:51
    
Thanks for the quick response. I just updated the question to make it clear about which instructions I am allowed to use. –  Shan Mar 11 '13 at 2:53
    
@nrz You're right, I missed that. –  Alexey Frunze Mar 11 '13 at 3:02
    
Thank you very much Alexey. I just wanted to confirm that this case is impossible. This is what I wrote in my original question: I am thinking it is impossible to get this flag combination. In order for the S-flag to be set together with the O-flag, the most significant bits of both numbers would have to be 0 and the most significant bit of the result would have to be 1. That leaves us with no way to generate a carry from the addition of the most significant bits. Is that the correct reasoning for this case being impossible? –  Shan Mar 11 '13 at 3:24
    
You beat me to it. A formal proof may be lengthy, but a "brute force" search is fast and easy. I did the brute force search and proved it's impossible. –  Brendan Mar 11 '13 at 3:24

Edit: Using only add al,ah or any other add it is impossible.

You can do it by popping flags / eflags into some register, then setting the flags you want with or, pushing the register and popping it into flags.

For 16-bit code (NASM syntax):

pushf
pop ax
or ax,0x881
push ax
popf

For 32-bit code:

pushfd
pop eax
or eax,0x881
push eax
popfd
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Thanks for the quick response. I just updated the question to make it clear about which instructions I am allowed to use. –  Shan Mar 11 '13 at 2:53

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