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Here is what I thought would work: I have a dictionary indexed by game and containing gameSlots Confirmed that: {{gameSlot.game.name}} is valid (and other gameSlot.game.x properties are also fine) Confirmed that: assignedGameSlotsInMyGames was holding a {game: [gameSlot1, gameSlot1]} But: {% for gameSlot2 in assignedGameSlotsInMyGames[gameSlot.game] %} has no iterations

Am I doing something obviously wrong? (I can post more complete code if needed - I have swapped out the code with a pretty ugly workaround but would be happy to bring it back to show test results, etc.).

More details added....
Data is: assignedGameSlotsInMyGames contains one game (named "Later") which has two assigned gameSlots.

The workaround prints the contents of those gameSlots:

{% for game, gameSlots in assignedGameSlotsInMyGames.iteritems() %}
  {% if gameSlot.game.name == game.name %}
    {% for gameSlot2 in gameSlots %}
      <tr>
        <td> {{gameSlot2.user.email}} </td>
        <td> {{gameSlot2.gameCharacter.characterType}} </td>
      </tr>
    {% endfor %}
  {% endif %}
{% endfor %}

Additional Note: The reason that there is:

if gameSlot.game.name == game.name

is that I am iterating through all the gameSlots that belong to a particular user. As I display that gameSlot, I want to include additional information about the game referred to by that gameSlot. Since my attempt (below) to directly reference that game didn't work, I loop through all the games and use the one that matches the current game in the "outer loop" (lame, yes - which is why I am posting the question). Note: for the example I was testing, there is just one game with the name "Later".

There is an outer loop that is moving through all the gameSlot.games - the only iteration is when gameSlot.game.name == "Later". Rather than all this extra loop, I thought I could use:

{% for gameSlot2 in assignedGameSlotsInMyGames[gameSlot.game] %}
  <tr><td>Iteration</td></tr>
{% endfor %}

I was thinking that since assignedGameSlotsInMyGames is a Dictionary indexed by a game object with values that are gameSlots, this should work. But there are no iterations printed.

Debugging code of:

<tr><td colspan="6">TestCode - gameSlot.game = {{gameSlot.game}}, assignedGameSlotsInMyGames[gameSlot.game] = {{assignedGameSlotsInMyGames[gameSlot.game]}} </td></tr>
<tr><td colspan="6">TestCode - gameSlot.game.name = {{gameSlot.game.name}}, assignedGameSlotsInMyGames = {{assignedGameSlotsInMyGames}}</td></tr>
<tr><td colspan="6">Test from Ellochka - assignedGameSlotsInMyGames.game = {{assignedGameSlotsInMyGames.game}}</td></tr>

Has output:

TestCode - gameSlot.game = , assignedGameSlotsInMyGames[gameSlot.game] =
TestCode - gameSlot.game.name = Later, assignedGameSlotsInMyGames = {: [, ]}
Test from Ellochka - assignedGameSlotsInMyGames.game =

This is my first experience with Jinja2 templates (and Python) so I could be very confused.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted
from jinja2 import Template

ts = """
{% for game, gameSlots in assignedGameSlotsInMyGames.iteritems() %}
{% for gameSlot2 in gameSlots %}
<tr>
<td> {{gameSlot2.user.email}} </td>
<td> {{gameSlot2.gameCharacter.characterType}} </td>
</tr>
{% endfor %}
{% endfor %}
"""

t = Template(ts)

d = {'assignedGameSlotsInMyGames':
     {'game1': [{'user': {'email': 'a@a.ru'},
                 'gameCharacter':{'characterType':'testCharacterType1'}},
                {'user': {'email': 'b@b.ru'},
                 'gameCharacter':{'characterType':'testCharacterType2'}}],
      'game2': [{'user': {'email': 'a2@a.ru'},
                 'gameCharacter':{'characterType':'testCharacterType12'}},
                {'user': {'email': 'b2@b.ru'},
                 'gameCharacter':{'characterType':'testCharacterType22'}}]
     }
}

print t.render(d)

The output is:

<tr>
<td> a2@a.ru </td>
<td> testCharacterType12 </td>
</tr>

<tr>
<td> b2@b.ru </td>
<td> testCharacterType22 </td>
</tr>



<tr>
<td> a@a.ru </td>
<td> testCharacterType1 </td>
</tr>

<tr>
<td> b@b.ru </td>
<td> testCharacterType2 </td>
</tr>

In your template I don't understand what {% if gameSlot.game.name == game.name %} is. You pass the key gameSlot separately or is it just a typo and you meant to write gameSlots?

For quite a clear answer you can write about the structure of the dictionary (example) that you pass to the render function(or etc) and I will tell where the error, if still is not clear.

UPDATED

ts = """
{% for g in games %}
    {% for v in ags[g.game]%}
        {{ v }}
    {% endfor %}
{% endfor %}
"""

d = {
      'games':[{'game':'A'},
           {'game':'B'},
           {'game':'C'}],
      'ags':{'A':['ONE','TWO','THREE'],'B':['1','2','3']}
}

t = Template(ts)
print t.render(d)

Output:

ONE

TWO

THREE



1

2

3

The only thing I can suggest you pass data to function uncorrectly and inappropriately handle them. See the documentation.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried that but it also did not iterate. I thought that since assignedGameSlotsInMyGames is a Dictionary, I needed to use the [] syntax. More details about the code also provided above. Thanks! –  Richard Berger Mar 11 '13 at 20:10
    
@RichardBerger,I corrected my answer. –  Ellochka Cannibal Mar 12 '13 at 17:07
    
Thank you for the additional info. I answered your question in the additional note (added to the original). The part that isn't working is: {% for gameSlot2 in assignedGameSlotsInMyGames[gameSlot.game] %} - even though gameSlot.game has a valid game that is in the assignedGameSlotsInMyGame dictionary. Perhaps I am expecting too much from Jinja2? –  Richard Berger Mar 12 '13 at 20:48
    
@RichardBerger,Everything is working properly and correctly. Despite the fact that you convey, and how to treat it. If a variable is not found empty string is returned, so as not to break the page contents. –  Ellochka Cannibal Mar 13 '13 at 9:20
    
Thank you - using your technique of "from jinja2 import Template" and running the code inside Python, debugging was much easier. The problem was that I was indexing my dictionary by the game Object (not by game Key) - and I was comparing two different objects (with the same name, key, etc). Thus the comparison was failing silently. Debugging in python made it all obvious. Thanks for your help in resolving - it was indeed my error. –  Richard Berger Mar 13 '13 at 15:28

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