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I'm making a deployment diagram in UML for a windows application software. I wanted to know if an installer is an artifact and how should I draw the diagram exactly?

Do I only put the installer inside the node that represents a client machine, or I put not only the installer, but the components that it installs in association with installer?

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As many Deployment Diagrams I saw there was no installer on them. I would say, that an Installer is not a part of a deployment, because you don't work on a deployed system with it (deployment diagram shows how a deployed system physically looks like, without showing the behavior of deployment). Hm, you could define a slice at the moment prepared installation and say that it is a deployment diagram of installation, is it what you want? Then I would take the second version (with associations) - it is more clear - you want describe the installation deployment. –  static Mar 11 '13 at 3:12
    
So, maybe I should not put installer as artifact, but the installed components insted, right? Under the suppose that, yes, it is a deployment diagram, not installation one. –  Xanathos Mar 11 '13 at 3:14
    
Installed and configured components on physical and operational infrastructure (<<device>>, <<execution Environment>>) form a deployed system. So I think yes - put installed components on that diagram. If you need to show the deployment process I would do it on another diagram. Here it looks like how a deployment (process) should be done: Deployment Specification, Deployment Specification Dependency, Deployment Specifiation Association. It shows what(<<artifact>>) and how(<<deployment spec>>, associations <<deploy>>) should be deployed. –  static Mar 11 '13 at 3:35
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but still, I did not see an installer as an <<artifact>> or a component. –  static Mar 11 '13 at 3:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Artifacts physically represent your components. A component is a logically consistent part of your application.

So you have an artifact for your installer only if it is a part of your project. I mean if you designed your own installer, then it is an artifact because it is a part of the "result" of your software project. Yet even in this case it may not be very useful to have it appear in a deployment diagram, because you typically do not deploy an installer...

Otherwise it will not be an artifact. You will have artifacts for your installed components, not the installer itself.

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