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What might make these two queries different?

The post is indeed mostly code.

SELECT DISTINCT S.name 
FROM 
    student S NATURAL JOIN taking NATURAL JOIN 
    (select * from class where classnum ='121') 
WHERE 
    department='CMPSC' 
    AND semester='Spring 2013';



SELECT DISTINCT S.name 
FROM 
    student S NATURAL JOIN taking NATURAL JOIN class 
WHERE 
    department='CMPSC' 
    AND semester='Spring 2013' 
    AND classnum='121';

Thank you!

EDIT:

As a response to the request for explain command: I had to do it on ORACLE so I'm not sure if this is the result expected:

This is the first query:

Plan hash value: 3259400360

------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                     | Name         |
------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT              |              |
|   1 |  HASH UNIQUE                  |              |
|   2 |   NESTED LOOPS                |              |
|   3 |    NESTED LOOPS               |              |
|   4 |     TABLE ACCESS FULL         | CLASS        |
|   5 |     INDEX FULL SCAN           | SYS_C0099014 |
|   6 |    TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| STUDENT      |
|   7 |     INDEX UNIQUE SCAN         | SYS_C0098998 |
------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   4 - filter("CLASSNUM"=121 AND "CLASS"."SEMESTER"='Spring 2013' AND
              "CLASS"."DEPARTMENT"='CMPSC')

PLAN_TABLE_OUTPUT
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
   5 - access("TAKING"."SCHEDULENUM"="CLASS"."SCHEDULENUM" AND
              "TAKING"."SEMESTER"='Spring 2013')
       filter("TAKING"."SEMESTER"='Spring 2013' AND
              "TAKING"."SCHEDULENUM"="CLASS"."SCHEDULENUM")
   7 - access("S"."STUDENTNUM"="TAKING"."STUDENTNUM")

Second QUERY:

PLAN_TABLE_OUTPUT
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 226170808

-------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                      | Name         |
-------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT               |              |
|   1 |  HASH UNIQUE                   |              |
|   2 |   HASH JOIN                    |              |
|   3 |    MERGE JOIN                  |              |
|   4 |     TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| STUDENT      |
|   5 |      INDEX FULL SCAN           | SYS_C0098998 |
|   6 |     SORT JOIN                  |              |
|   7 |      INDEX FULL SCAN           | SYS_C0099014 |
|   8 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL           | CLASS        |
-------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

PLAN_TABLE_OUTPUT
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

   2 - access("TAKING"."SEMESTER"="CLASS"."SEMESTER")
   6 - access("S"."STUDENTNUM"="TAKING"."STUDENTNUM")
       filter("S"."STUDENTNUM"="TAKING"."STUDENTNUM")
   7 - access("TAKING"."SEMESTER"='Spring 2013')
       filter("TAKING"."SEMESTER"='Spring 2013')
   8 - filter("CLASS"."CLASSNUM"=121 AND "CLASS"."SEMESTER"='Spring 2013' AND
              "CLASS"."DEPARTMENT"='CMPSC')
share|improve this question
1  
Are you saying the results are different or the performance? If the results are different, please post examples. –  Michael L. Mar 11 '13 at 4:07
    
Try running explain on the two queries to get the query execution plan; compare them to see the differences. Also post them here for others to analyse. [Explain syntax] (dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/explain.html) –  Kshitij Mar 11 '13 at 4:15
    
@Kshitij I hope this is what you asked for, I'm running Oracle. –  ammoun Mar 11 '13 at 4:43
    
What is the actual question? –  APC Mar 11 '13 at 20:47
    
The original question is, is there any case where both queries do not produce same output? –  ammoun Mar 12 '13 at 23:47

1 Answer 1

If performance is the issue, it is because you are defeating the indexing. When the sub-query is executed, the server can use indexes to retrieve the results; however, it can not index the results of the sub-query, resulting in worse performance. Generally speaking attempts to 'outsmart' the optimizer do not work well - you will either end up with queries that are harder to read and do exactly the same thing (the optimizer will optimize the query to something identical to what it was originally) or you will end up with cases like this where the performance is worse. JOIN clauses should be used to define the join, not constrain the data.

The optimizer will execute the following queries identically:

SELECT *
FROM foo f
  JOIN bar b
    ON f.id = b.id
      AND b.col = 'baz'

and

SELECT *
FROM foo f
  JOIN bar b
    ON f.id = b.id
WHERE b.col = 'baz'

whereas

SELECT *
FROM foo f
  JOIN (
    SELECT *
    FROM bar b
    WHERE col = 'baz'
  ) AS b
  ON f.id = b.id

essentially generates a non-indexed in-memory temp table in mysql. It executes identically to the previous two in sql server.

share|improve this answer
    
This is very interesting Michael, could you look at explain output? –  ammoun Mar 11 '13 at 4:54
    
It looks like SQL Server will actually optimize all three queries to be identical. MySQL, however, will not. Look at these SQL Fiddles and click 'View Execution Plan': SQL Fiddle Query #1, SQL Fiddle Query #2, SQL Fiddle Query #3 –  Michael L. Mar 11 '13 at 12:19

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