Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This program I have here doesn't print out correctly. Here is the input:

How many employees? 2

Enter employee 1 info: month/day/year, age, height, name: 3/21/34, 43, 3.4, hdsfgdf

Enter employee 2 info: month/day/year, age, height, name: 4/44/44, 44, 6.2, dfgtesas

This is the output:

Employee 1 information: 0/-1081689528/134514548, 16564212, 0.0, ��

Employee 2 information: 0/1/14608664, -1217230008, 0.0, ��ܹ����

My only guess is that I'm not populating the array correctly or maybe I'm printing out the addresses rather than the data. Am I right to be assuming that? Any bit of advice would help. Thank you so much!

My code is in 3 files.

This is the main:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include "list.h"
#include "personal.c"

LIST *start, *end;

int main(void)
{
int i, numEmp;  

PERSON person;

start=end=NULL;
printf("How many employees? ");
    scanf("%d", &numEmp);
PERSON employees[numEmp];

for (i = 0; i < numEmp; i++)
{
printf("Enter employee %d info: month/day/year, age, height, name:\n", i+1);
scanf("%d/%d/%d,%d,%f,%s", &person.bday.month, &person.bday.day,
          &person.bday.year, &person.age, &person.height, person.name);
    add(&start, &end, person);

}
for (i = 0; i < numEmp; i++)
{
printf("Employee %d information:\n%d/%d/%d, %d, %.1f, %s\n", i+1, employees[i].bday.month, employees[i].bday.day, employees[i].bday.year, employees[i].age, employees[i].height, employees[i].name);

delete(&start, &end);
}

This is the list with the structures:

#ifndef LIST_H_ /* to prevent re-definitions */
#define LIST_H_ /* that cause errors */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>


typedef struct DATE
{
    int month;
    int day;
    int year;
} DATE;

typedef struct PERSON
{
    char name[41];
    int age;
    float height;
    DATE bday;

} PERSON;

typedef struct list 
{
PERSON data; 
struct list *next;
} LIST;

#endif

And this is where all my methods are:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include "list.h"


int delete (LIST **head, LIST **tail){
    LIST *temp;

    if (*head == NULL)
        return -1;

    PERSON retVal = (*head)->data;

    if(*head==*tail){
        free(*head);
        *head=*tail=NULL;
    }
    else{
        temp=(*head)->next;
        free(*head);
        *head=temp;
    }

    //return retVal;
}

void add(LIST **head, LIST **tail, PERSON data){
    if(*tail==NULL){
        *head=*tail=(LIST *) malloc(sizeof(LIST));
        (*head)->data=data;//use arrow when struct is pointer. Use . if have direct access to struct
        (*head)->next=NULL;
    }
    else{
        (*tail)->next= (LIST *) malloc(sizeof(LIST));
        *tail=(*tail)->next;
        (*tail)->data=data;
        (*tail)->next=NULL;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I suggest you add printf() calls to debug your code or fire up an IDE and use its debugger. –  Code-Apprentice Mar 11 '13 at 4:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You create both a variable-length array (employees) and a linked list. You add elements to your linked list but try to print the contents of your variable-length array (which you never wrote anything to).

Either:

  1. Read the data into your VLA.

    for (i = 0; i < numEmp; i++)
    {
        printf("Enter employee %d info: month/day/year, age, height, name:\n", i+1);
        scanf("%d/%d/%d,%d,%f,%s", &employees[i].bday.month, &employees[i].bday.day,
          &employees[i].bday.year, &employees[i].age, &employees[i].height, employees[i].name);
    }
    
  2. Forget about the VLA and print only the contents of your linked list.

    i = 0;
    for (LIST *item = start; item != NULL; item = item->next)
        printf("Employee %d information:\n%d/%d/%d, %d, %.1f, %s\n", ++i, item->data.bday.month, item->data.bday.day, item->data.bday.year, item->data.age, item->data.height, item->data.name);
    
share|improve this answer
    
Oh! #2 worked!!! Thank you!!! –  Hokerie Mar 11 '13 at 4:36
    
When is it appropriate to use -> instead of . ? –  Hokerie Mar 11 '13 at 5:16
    
@Hokerie: x->y is equivalent to (*x).y so you can only use -> when x is a pointer to a struct, rather than an actual struct object. –  dreamlax Mar 11 '13 at 23:45
printf("Employee %d information:\n%d/%d/%d, %d, %.1f, %s\n", i+1, 
        employees[i].bday.month, employees[i].bday.day, employees[i].bday.year,
         employees[i].age, employees[i].height, employees[i].name);

You are trying to print employees array, which is never initialized.

share|improve this answer
    
PERSON employees[numEmp]; isn't initializing it? –  Hokerie Mar 11 '13 at 4:23
1  
@Hokerie: That's declaring it, initialising it means assigning it an initial value. –  dreamlax Mar 11 '13 at 4:24
    
So I guess add(&start, &end, person); didn't fill it correctly? –  Hokerie Mar 11 '13 at 4:30
    
@Hokerie, isn't that filling the link list not the employees array. –  Rohan Mar 11 '13 at 4:36
    
Ah I see. Thank you. –  Hokerie Mar 11 '13 at 4:54

Run your program under valgrind. It's a free tool which detects memory errors in code automatically. It will likely be able to highlight for you exactly where your code is reading or writing something invalid.

All you have to do is run your program with valgrind in front of it, assuming you're on a Linux system and have installed the valgrind package.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.