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How can I parse a decimal value exactly? That is, I have a string of the value, like "43.879" and I wish to get an exact GMP value. I'm not clear from the docs how, or whether this is actually possible. It doesn't seem to fit in the integer/rational/float value types -- though perhaps twiddling with rational is possible.

My intent is to retain exact precision decimals over operations like addition and subtraction, but to switch to high-precision floating point for operations like division or exponents.

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1 Answer 1

Most libraries give you arbitrarily large precision, GMP included. However even with large precision there are some numbers that cannot be represented exactly in binary format, much same as you cannot represent 1/3 in decimal. For many applications setting the precision to a high number, like 10, doing the calculations, and then rounding the results back to desired precision, like 3 works. Would it not work for you? See this - Is there a C++ equivalent to Java's BigDecimal?

You could also use http://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/intel-decimal-floating-point-math-library

*** EDITS

Exact representation DOES NOT exist in binary floating point for many numbers; the kind that most current floating point libraries offer. A number like 0.1 CANNOT be represented as a binary number, whatever be the precision.

To be able to do what you suggest the library would have to do equivalent of 'hand addition', 'hand division' - the kind you do on pencil and paper to add two decimal numbers. e.g. to store 0.1, the library might elect to represent it as a string itself and then do additions on strings. Needless to say a naive implementation would make the process exceedingly slow - orders of magnitude slow. To add 0.1 + 0.1, it would have to parse string, add 1+1, remember the carries, remember the decimal position etc. That is the thing that the computer micro code does for you in few CPU cycles (or a single instruction). Instead of single instruction, your software library would end up taking like 100 CPU cycles/instructions.

If it tries to convert 0.1 to a number, it is back to square 1 - 0.1 cannot be a number in binary.

However people do recognize the need for representing 0.1 exactly. It is just that binary number representation is NOT going to do it. That is where newer floating point standards come in, and that is where the intel decimal point library is headed.

Repeating my previous example, suppose you had a 10 base computer that could do 10 base numbers. that computer cannot store 1/3 as a 'plain' floating point number. It would have to store the representation that the number is 1/3. The equivalent of how it is written on paper. Try writing 1/3 as a base 10 floating point number on paper.

Also see Why can't decimal numbers be represented exactly in binary?

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Yes, I understand this. I just want to exactly represent numbers parsed from a string in decimal form. It's guaranteed that an exact representation must exist for those, either as a rational number, or an integer times some power of ten. I'm just wondering how to get that number parsed in GMP (since rational doesn't expose such a parser). –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Mar 11 '13 at 8:41
    
Exact representation DOES NOT exist in binary floating point for many numbers; the kind that most current floating point libraries offer. A number like 0.1 CANNOT be represented as a binary number, whatever be the precision. However people do recognize the need for representing 0.1 exactly. It is just that binary number representation is NOT going to do it.That is where newer floating point standards come in, and that is where the intel decimal point library is headed. –  Amit Mar 11 '13 at 13:28
    
GMP has a "rational" class where 0.1 can be represented exactly as 1/10. I'm looking for a standard way to parse the decimal numbers into that form (assuming rational is the correct form). –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Mar 11 '13 at 14:36
    
Then why don't you just remove that decimal from input string, 'remember' where the decimal was and then create a rational out of it? 1.23 = 123/100. 10-15 lines of code. But if you do rational, you will get rational. You WILL get 1/10 for 0.1. The moment you try to get 0.1 out of 1/10 it, you are back to where you began. Repeating - you can write 1/3 on paper. But, e.g. you cannot give back 1/3 dollar to someone; you can't - not without rounding; not even if you had infinite further sub divisions of cent. Dollar is working on base 10, and there is nothing in base 10 to represent 1/3. –  Amit Mar 12 '13 at 13:15

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