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Recently I've read a lot about parallel programming in .NET but I am still confused by contradicting statements over the texts on this subject.

For example, tThe popup (upon pointing a mouse on tag's icon) description of the stackoverflow.com task-parallel-library tag:

"The Task Parallel Library is part of .NET 4. It is a set of APIs tpo enable developers to program multi-core shared memory processors"

Does this mean that multi-core-d and parallel programming applications impossible using prior versions of .NET?

Do I control a multicore/parallel usage/ditribution between cores in .NET multithreaded application?

How can I identify a core on which a thread to be run and attribute a thread to a specific core?

What has the .NET 4.0+ Task Parallel Library enabled that was impossible to do in previous versions of .NET?

Update:
Well, it was difficult to formulate specific questions but I'd like to better understand:

What is the difference in .NET between developing a multi-threaded application and parallel programming?

So far, I could not grasp the difference between them

Update2:
MSDN "Parallel Programming in the .NET Framework" starts from version .NET 4.0 and its article Task Parallel Library tells:

"Starting with the .NET Framework 4, the TPL is the preferred way to write multithreaded and parallel code"

Can you give me hints how to specifically create parallel code in pre-.NET4 (in .NET3.5), taking into account that I am familiar with multi-threading development?

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2  
i wont say IMPOSSIBLE but Not implemented! – PaRiMaL RaJ Mar 11 '13 at 5:25
4  
This is way, way too many questions in one question. – Eric Lippert Mar 11 '13 at 5:52
    
@Eric Lippert, I've tried to start spawning new questions but I am afraid they will be closed as duplicates since the basic question under all of them is: "What is the difference between parallel programming and multi-thread development in .NET" – Fulproof Mar 11 '13 at 6:06
    
@Fulproof But most of your questions are not asking about that. – svick Mar 11 '13 at 11:34
up vote 8 down vote accepted

I see "multithreading" as just what the term says: using multiple threads.

"Parallel processing" would be: splitting up a group of work among multiple threads so the work can be processed in parallel.

Thus, parallel processing is a special case of multithreading.


Does this mean that multi-core-d and parallel programming applications impossible using prior versions of .NET?

Not at all. You could do it using the Thread class. It was just much harder to write, and much much harder to get it right.

Do I control a multicore/parallel usage/ditribution between cores in .NET multithreaded application?

Not really, but you don't need to. You can mess around with processor affinity for your application, but at the .NET level that's hardly ever a winning strategy.

The Task Parallel Library includes a "partitioner" concept that can be used to control the distribution of work, which is a better solution that controlling the distribution of threads over cores.

How can I identify a core on which a thread to be run and attribute a thread to a specific core?

You're not supposed to do this. A .NET thread doesn't necessarily correspond with an OS thread; you're at a higher level of abstraction than that. Now, the default .NET host does map threads 1-to-1, so if you want to depend on an undocumented implementation detail, then you can poke through the abstraction and use P/invoke to determine/drive your processor affinity. But as noted above, it's not useful.

What has the .NET 4.0+ Task Parallel Library enabled that was impossible to do in previous versions of .NET?

Nothing. But it sure has made parallel processing (and multithreading) much easier!

Can you give me hints how to specifically create parallel code in pre-.NET4 (in .NET3.5), taking into account that I am familiar with multi-threading development?

First off, there's no reason to develop for that platform. None. .NET 4.5 is already out, and the last version (.NET 4.0) supports all OSes that the next older version (.NET 3.5) did.

But if you really want to, you can do simple parallel processing by spinning up Thread objects or BackgroundWorkers, or by queueing work directly to the thread pool. All of these approaches require more code (particularly around error handling) than the Task type in the TPL.

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1  
So you wouldn't consider using a single thread to download multiple files in parallel “parallel processing”? Or using a grid of several computers, each running a single thread? – svick Mar 11 '13 at 12:15
    
It's a personal choice. I use the term "concurrent" for multiple simultaneous operations (so "parallel" is a special case of "multithreading" which is a special case of "concurrent"). So if you have an async-based multiple file download I would call that "concurrent programming" but not "parallel programming". I'd call the grid "distributed". AFAICT, there's no universally-accepted definitions of these terms, so that's just how I choose to use them. – Stephen Cleary Mar 11 '13 at 12:20

What if i ask you "Do you write business software with your own developed language? or Do you drink water after digging your own well?"

That's the difference in writing multi threading by creating threads and manage them around while you can use abstraction over threads using TPL. Multicore and scheduling of threads on cores is maintained at OS so you don't need to worry about whether your threads are getting executed on the cores your system supports AFAIK.

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This is probably the excellent answer for those who know the answer and does not need it already (I upvoted yours, though I liked more another one and surprised it is undervoted) – Fulproof Mar 11 '13 at 6:22
    
@Fulproof : :-) , please downvote it , i didn't know that you know it. – TalentTuner Mar 11 '13 at 6:50
    
I ask what I do not know and want to know – Fulproof Mar 11 '13 at 13:16

Check this article, it basically sums up what was (virtually) impossible before TPL, even though many companies had brewed their own parallel processing libraries none of them had been fully optimized to take advantage of all resources of the popular architectures (simply because it's big task & Microsoft has a lot of resources + they are good). Also it's interesting to note Intel's counterpart implementation TBB vs TPL

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Does this mean that multi-core-d and parallel programming applications impossible using prior versions of .NET?

Not at all. Types like Thread and ThreadPool for scheduling computations on other threads and ManualResetEvent for synchronization were there since .Net 1.

Do I control a multicore/parallel usage/ditribution between cores in .NET multithreaded application?

No, that's mostly the job of the OS. You can set ProcessorAffinity of a ProcessThread, but there is no simple way to get a ProcessThread from a Thread (because it was originally thought that .Net Threads may not directly correspond to OS threads). There is usually no reason to do this and you especially shouldn't do it for ThreadPool threads.

What has the .NET 4.0+ Task Parallel Library enabled that was impossible to do in previous versions of .NET?

I'd say it didn't make anything impossible possible. But it made lots of tasks much simpler.

You could always write your own version of ThreadPool and manually use synchronization primitives (like ManualResetEvent) for synchronization between threads. But doing that properly and efficiently is lots of error-prone work.

What is the difference in .NET between developing a multi-threaded application and parallel programming?

This is just a question of naming and doesn't have much to do with your previous questions. Parallel programming means performing multiple operations at the same time, but it doesn't say how do you achieve parallelism. For that, you could use multiple computers, or multiple processes or multiple threads, or even a single thread.

(Parallel programming on a single thread can work if the operations are not CPU-bound, like reading a file from disk or fetching some data from the internet.)

So, multi-threaded programming is a subset of parallel programming, though one that's most commonly used on .Net.

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Multithreading used to be available on single-core CPUs. I believe in .NET world, "parallel programming" represents compiler/language, as well as namespace and "library" additions, that facilitate multi-core capabilities (better than before). In this sense "parallel programming" is a category under multithreading, that provides improved support for multiple CPUa/cores.

My own ponderings: at the same time I see .NET "parallel programming" to encompass not only multi-threading, but other techniques. Consider the fact that the new async/await facilities don't guarantee multi-threading, as in certain scenarios they are only an abstraction of the continuation-passing-style paradigm that could accomplish everything on a single thread. Include in the mix parallelism that comes from running different processes (potentially on different machines) and in that sense, multithreading is only a portion of the broader concept of "parallel programming".

But if you consider the .NET releases I think the former is a better explanation.

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Does you answer imply that it is possible to make asynchronous call inside the same (a single) thread? – Fulproof Mar 11 '13 at 13:19
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Yes, under certain conditions. If I am not mistaken, literature often refers that async/await don't guarantee execution on a different thread. When I dug for explanation, I came across some great posts by Eric Lippert - search for "Continuation Passing Style Revisited" on his blog – G. Stoynev Mar 12 '13 at 2:40
    
Thanks, I am on .NET 4 and prefer to postpone digging into .NET 5.0 concepts.If you find anything illustrating it in .NET 4 (or before), please share it – Fulproof Mar 12 '13 at 7:26
    
You mean .NET 4.5, I assume. I think discussed principles are all from pre-.NET 4.5 times or not framework-specific at all - just general patterns. As to sharing somethign that might work in 4.0 - I believe you could amend the 4.0 framework to support the async/await by installing an optional package. – G. Stoynev Mar 12 '13 at 15:26

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