Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Can somebody explain this?

1 == 1        //true, as expected
1 === 1       //true, as expected
1 == 1 == 1   //true, as expected
1 == 1 == 2   //false, as expected
1 === 1 === 2 //false, as expected
1 === 1 === 1 //false? <--

Also is there a name for boolean logic that compares more than two numbers in this way (I called it "three-variable comparison" but I think that'd be wrong...)

share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

This expression:

1 === 1 === 1

Is evaluated as:

(1 === 1) === 1

After evaluating the expression inside parentheses:

true === 1

And that expression is logically false. The below expression returns true as expected though:

1 === 1 === true
share|improve this answer
1  
Haha, should have tested more: 5 == 5 == 5 is also false, but because 1 == true I was getting tripped up using my example of 1 == 1 == 1. +1 thanks! – stackunderflow Mar 11 '13 at 5:52
    
One more question: can I do what I want to do without a tedious expression (such as x === y && y === z && x === z)? – stackunderflow Mar 11 '13 at 5:57
    
@DuncanNZ Are there always three variables involved? – Ja͢ck Mar 11 '13 at 5:59
    
yes - basically I need to check that 3 strings are all equal to eachother – stackunderflow Mar 11 '13 at 6:01
1  
@vsync Generally, to compare N distinct variables for equality (N > 1) you need N - 1 comparisons. – Ja͢ck May 9 '13 at 12:52

Equality is a left-to-right precedence operation.

So:

1 == 1 == 1
true == 1
true

And:

1 === 1 === 1
true === 1
false // because triple-equals checks type as well
share|improve this answer
    
+1 thanks. Already accepted Jack's answer though. – stackunderflow Mar 11 '13 at 5:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.