Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm serializing a class like this

public MyClass
{
    public int? a { get; set; }
    public int? b { get; set; }
    public int? c { get; set; }
}

All of the types are nullable because I want minimal data stored when serializing an object of this type. However, when it is serialized with only "a" populated, I get the following xml

<MyClass ...>
    <a>3</a>
    <b xsi:nil="true" />
    <c xsi:nil="true" />
</MyClass>

How do I set this up to only get xml for the non null properties? The desired output would be

<MyClass ...>
    <a>3</a>
</MyClass>

I want to exclude these null values because there will be several properties and this is getting stored in a database (yeah, thats not my call) so I want to keep the unused data minimal.

share|improve this question
1  
If you added up all the time developers waste trying to get xml to look how they think it should look... you'd have a whole crapton of developer hours. I gave up long ago. You should consider that as an option. –  Will Oct 7 '09 at 18:33
    
@Will, I normally would, no problem at all, but this will be used thousands of times a day and the whole class, serialized, is about 1000 characters, thats if all the properties are null! Also, all this is going in the db, not my choice :( –  Allen Rice Oct 7 '09 at 18:37
2  
This is a good question, but I think it's a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1296468/… (which Marc Gravell answered by discussing the specification pattern). –  Jeff Sternal Oct 7 '09 at 18:51
1  
Rough one, Allen. –  Will Oct 7 '09 at 19:03

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I suppose you could create an XmlWriter that filters out all elements with an xsi:nil attribute, and passes all other calls to the underlying true writer.

share|improve this answer
    
I like it, very simple, great idea :) –  Allen Rice Oct 8 '09 at 14:18

You ignore specific elements with specification

public MyClass
{
    public int? a { get; set; }

    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlIgnore]
    public bool aSpecified { get { return this.a != null; } }

    public int? b { get; set; }
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlIgnore]
    public bool bSpecified { get { return this.b != null; } }

    public int? c { get; set; }
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlIgnore]
    public bool cSpecified { get { return this.c != null; } }
}

The {field}Specified properties will tell the serializer if it should serialize the corresponding fields or not by returning true/false.

share|improve this answer
    
note: I answered this because honestly, I'm looking for a better solution, I'm not a big fan of all these extra fields as my class has SEVERAL fields to serialize –  Allen Rice Oct 7 '09 at 18:25
2  
I may have misunderstood your 'bonus', but null strings are automatically omitted, without the xsi:nil="true" flotsam. –  Jeff Sternal Oct 7 '09 at 18:49
    
@Jeff, Ah, so they are :-P Thanks –  Allen Rice Oct 7 '09 at 18:59
    
No problem - and incidentally, I hope someone more ingenious than me comes up with a more elegant workaround than the specification pattern. :) –  Jeff Sternal Oct 8 '09 at 13:45

Have you read SO: Serialize a nullable int ?

share|improve this answer

The simplest way of writing code like this where the exact output is important is to:

  1. Write an XML Schema describing your exact desired format.
  2. Convert your schema to a class using xsd.exe.
  3. Convert your class back to a schema (using xsd.exe again) and check it against your original schema to make sure that the serializer correctly reproduced every behaviour you want.

Tweak and repeat until you have working code.

If you are not sure of the exact data types to use initially, start with step 3 instead of step 1, then tweak.

IIRC, for your example you will almost certainly end up with Specified properties as you have already described, but having them generated for you sure beats writing them by hand. :-)

share|improve this answer

Mark the element with [XmlElement("elementName", IsNullable = false)] null values will be omitted.

share|improve this answer
1  
This won't work. The XmlSerializer throws an exception when a property of type int? is cnfigured like this. –  Abbondanza Feb 1 '13 at 15:41

Better late than never...

I found a way (maybe only available with the latest framework I don't know) to do this. I was using DataMember attribute for a WCF webservice contract and I marked my object like this:

[DataMember(EmitDefaultValue = false)]
public decimal? RentPrice { get; set; }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.