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Anyone have a ticketing system they like and recommend for developers in a Windows environment?

Note, we're not using TFS.

  1. We're using Tortoise Subversion.
  2. We're in a Windows environment.
  3. I don't want some cheesy half-assed ticketing system. (A lot of free ones just suck and yes, look bad; the UI is obviously a jack job for a lot of them.)
  4. I want something that makes sense for developers.
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closed as not constructive by Bobby, ronalchn, Eitan T, jonsca, S.L. Barth Sep 24 '12 at 10:59

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1  
Write your own ticket systems are very simple. –  JonH Oct 7 '09 at 18:34
    
For real - check out JIRA. It's awesome. –  Nathan Oct 7 '09 at 18:50
2  
Scads of dups under bug-tracking –  DJ. Oct 7 '09 at 18:51
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Agreed, tons of questions and answers about bug tracking, just look at the 'related' sidebar –  esac Oct 7 '09 at 19:00
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Redmine - very good quality, free, open source, very active. –  Yurik Oct 7 '09 at 19:26

8 Answers 8

up vote 7 down vote accepted

JIRA is awesome. I've used several other issue/ticket tracking systems, and by far this is my favorite.

They have several other tools that integrate nicely with JIRA:

  • Greenhopper - Agile development
  • Bamboo - Continuous Integration
  • Confluence - enterprise wiki

Right now they have them all on sale for $10 a piece (for 10 users in perpetuity, but more is $$)

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2  
I second the choice of JIRA, although it comes from Java world. One of its most powerful features is open architecture and lots, lots of third-party plugins. Although I'm a bit biased (our company makes JIRA Client - the desktop client for JIRA with VS2008 integration / may be of interest to you if you'd like JIRA in a Windows UI / pardon me for the little self promotion), you don't have to take advice for granted - trying it out doesn't cost anything, and starter licenses cost almost nothing. –  sereda Oct 7 '09 at 20:22
    
In JIRA's user-based pricing, who is a user? Only the developers, or anyone who submits bugs? –  Lance Fisher Oct 20 '09 at 7:47
1  
I believe it's 1 user = 1 login. It's anyone who wants to do anything in JIRA. –  Nathan Oct 20 '09 at 18:12

FogBugz

http://www.fogcreek.com/FogBUGZ/

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onlything that I do not like is a subscription basis, otherwise nice. –  CoffeeAddict Oct 7 '09 at 18:33
    
We like to own our own software. –  CoffeeAddict Oct 7 '09 at 18:33
9  
Then buy the download version and install it on your own server. –  Lazarus Oct 7 '09 at 18:35
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I've been very happy with the installed version for the past several years. It was easy to set up. It is easy to maintain and very easy to upgrade as new versions come out. –  Lee Oct 7 '09 at 18:38

I've been pleased with Trac, which fits particularly well with Subversion. It's not the most featureful bug tracker out there (by far), but the features it has are high-quality and the internlinking between tickets, wiki pages (for docs/dev notes) and Subversion commit logs are very nice. It also supports a large number of plugins to support features not yet in the base system.

It is a web app, so you will need a server to deploy it on. I do not know how well it works on a Windows server, but I think it's possible to get it running.

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2  
We use Trac in a windows environment, it works really well and it integrates very nicely with Tortoise Subversion. –  Ricardo Oct 7 '09 at 18:39
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Track looks a bit simplistic to me, a little bit too much. Not looking for something overly complex but Trac looks like a very ameture type of product in my opinion. I could be totally wrong. –  CoffeeAddict Oct 7 '09 at 19:25

Redmine for me. Open source, looks nice, very configurable, good SVN integration (including a nice code review plugin), quite a few plugins and you can get it as a ready to run "stack" from Bitnami.

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Extensively using at our firm. Free, good quality, very active project, excellent features, good integration with other systems. –  Yurik Oct 7 '09 at 19:25

Gemini

Full-featured and easy to use. Recommended by 9 out of 10 dentists.

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At work we use Axosoft Ontime. Great bug tracking software that we also use for IT help desk.

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+1 for redmine or trac

-1 for fogbugz. Nothing but trouble

+5 for jira if you have the money to spare

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jira now costs $10 if you have 10 or fewer people in the project –  sereda Oct 9 '09 at 13:17
    
What kind of trouble is FogBugz? –  Sam Mar 27 '10 at 17:50
    
We had difficulty installing it on windows (which - I was led to believe - was the preferred host os at the time). The interface is too "windows-esque"; It does not seem intuitive to us (the devs) or the non-technical users. Too much reliance on flaky javascript widgets. And navigating the db schema is a nightmare; Naming convention gone mad. To be equitable, I have heard many positive stories of Fogbugz. We just found redmine to be a simpler, more satisfying solution. –  Rob Cowie Apr 5 '10 at 11:34

I have used FogBugz before. It's quite full featured. It even has a plug-in to TortoiseSVN that allows you to link work items to check-ins.

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Wow - three answers all for FogBugz in less than a minute. I'd take that as a good sign of something. –  HitLikeAHammer Oct 7 '09 at 18:33
    
Yea, I'll wait for more. I'm curious what else is around that's recommended. –  CoffeeAddict Oct 7 '09 at 18:34

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