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With the code below.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        BaseClass obj = new BaseClass();
        DerivedClass obj2 = new DerivedClass();

        var x = obj.Method(2);
        var z = obj2.Method(1);
    }
}

class BaseClass
{
    public int Method(int i) { return i; }
}

class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    public string Method(int i) { return i.ToString(); }
}

Why is that when I have the method in the derived class, the derived class object is calling its own function and if I do not have it, the derived class object is calling the base function?

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seems to be textual question –  Freelancer Mar 11 '13 at 8:31
    
Because OOP works in that way –  voo Mar 11 '13 at 8:32
    
What do you expect? –  Mohayemin Mar 11 '13 at 8:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You should have received a warning from the compiler about this. Your new Method() method is implicitly hiding the base's (you can make this explicit using the new keyword, which will also silence the compiler warning). See also http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa691135%28v=vs.71%29.aspx.

Note that in C# there is no such thing as overloading a method based only on its output type. Just because your new method happens to return a string doesn't make its signature any different from the base's.

Note the following caveat about the dangers of hiding, which may also help to illustrate what is going on:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    BaseClass obj = new BaseClass();
    DerivedClass obj2 = new DerivedClass();

    var x = obj.Method(2); //returns 2
    var z = obj2.Method(1); //returns 2 (2*2)
    var a = ((BaseClass)obj2).Method(1); //returns 1 (base's implementation!)
}

class BaseClass
{
    public int Method(int i) { return i; }
}

class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    public int Method(int i) { return i * 2; }
}

This is unlike the behavior in the following code, which adds a new Method(string) overload:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    BaseClass obj = new BaseClass();
    DerivedClass obj2 = new DerivedClass();

    var x = obj.Method(2); //returns 2
    var z = obj2.Method("1"); //returns "1"
    var a = ((BaseClass)obj2).Method("1"); //returns "1"
}

class BaseClass
{
    public int Method(int i) { return i; }
}

class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    public string Method(string s) { return s; }
}
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If you want to override this behavior then you can mark a method with the new modifier which will explicitly hide a member in the class you derive from.

public new string Method(int i) { return i.ToString(); }
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The new keyword doesn't really change the behavior in any way. So you don't really answer the original question, in my humble opinion. Writing new only means: "I know the class already had a member with the same signature, but I insist in choosing the exact same name for the new member I'm introducing. I know you feel it may lead to errors, but I want it that way. So stop warning me!" Actually, it is almost always a bad idea to use the new modifier. Why not choose an unused name for the new member? –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Mar 11 '13 at 8:48
    
Hi Nielsen, Thanks for the reply. This was a question that has come to my mind while working on some sample.I am still reading the msdn to get the gist out of it and was curious to know the internals of c#. –  Uday Mar 11 '13 at 9:16

this is because , you hide the base method in derived class and when you create a object of derived class , it will call its own implementation. Compiler shouts when you do it without proper mechanism ( By using new keyword) and when you don't have the method in derived class then base class implementation kicked in.

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Inheritance means that your DerivedClass automatically has all the members that BaseClass has. Therefore it also has the Method which returns int.

It's a bad idea to introduce a new method with the same name and the same arguments, in the DerivedClass. Because then DerivedClass has two methods with the same signature. That's why you get a warning from the compiler. Even if the warning goes away when you use the modifier of the new keyword, it's still a bad idea to have two methods with the same signature.

Instead, choose an unused name for the method in DerivedClass.

To answer your question more directly: When you have one method Method only, the one you wrote inside BaseClass, all is good. The DerivedClass inherits this method. This is why you can call it on obj2. But when you introduce a second method in DerivedClass, the call obj2.Method(1); needs to choose between two methods, because unfortunately there are two methods with the same signature. The rule in this case is to choose the method defined in DerivedClass. But note that it's the compile-time type that matters here. So if you said

BaseClass obj3 = new DerivedClass();
var w = obj3.Method(42);

even if the run-time type of obj3 is DerivedClass, it's the first method that gets called because of the compile-time type. Like I said, obj3 possesses both methods.

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