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Suppose I have a mechanism for long-running computations that can suspend themselves to be resumed later:

sealed trait LongRunning[+R];
case class Result[+R](result: R) extends LongRunning[R];
case class Suspend[+R](cont: () => LongRunning[R]) extends LongRunning[R];

The simplest way how to run them is

@annotation.tailrec
def repeat[R](body: LongRunning[R]): R =
  body match {
    case Result(r)   => r
    case Suspend(c)  => {
      // perhaps do some other processing here
      println("Continuing suspended computation");
      repeat(c());
    }
  }

The problem is creating such computations. Let's say we want to implement tail-recursive factorial that suspends its computation every 10 cycles:

@annotation.tailrec
def factorial(n: Int, acc: BigInt): LongRunning[BigInt] = {
  if (n <= 1)
    Result(acc);
  else if (n % 10 == 0)
    Suspend(() => factorial(n - 1, acc * n))
  else
    factorial(n - 1, acc * n)
}

But this does not compile:

error: could not optimize @tailrec annotated method factorial: it contains a recursive call not in tail position

Suspend(() => factorial(n - 1, acc * n))

How to retain tail recursion on the non-suspending calls?

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Just FYI: LongRunning is the partiality monad! –  Mysterious Dan Mar 11 '13 at 17:44
    
@MyseriousDan Thanks, that's very interesting. Actually, LongRunning is a simplification of my original problem - I'm working on a conduit-like library for Scala scala-conduit where Pipe naturally forms a monad. –  Petr Pudlák Mar 11 '13 at 18:13
    
Yeah, that kind of thing is generally an instantiation of a free monad of some sort. The partiality one is a little odd because it's generally represented as a corecursive thunk, but whether you have Free[() => _, R] or Free[ChunkOfData => _, R] makes little fundamental difference. –  Mysterious Dan Mar 11 '13 at 18:16
2  
Note also that this actually already exist in the standard library: scala-lang.org/api/current/… –  Régis Jean-Gilles Mar 11 '13 at 19:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I found one possible answer. We can move the tail-recursive part into an inner function, and refer to the outer one, non-tail-recursive, when we need:

def factorial(n: Int, acc: BigInt): LongRunning[BigInt] = {
  @annotation.tailrec
  def f(n: Int, acc: BigInt): LongRunning[BigInt] =
    if (n <= 1)
      Result(acc);
    else if (n % 10 == 0)
      Suspend(() => factorial(n - 1, acc * n))
    else
      f(n - 1, acc * n)
  f(n, acc)
}
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Am I right saying that this going to re-create closure instance on every factorial call? –  om-nom-nom Mar 11 '13 at 9:08
    
@om-nom-nom I'm not really sure how well Scala optimizes such closures. Anyway, they're created only for suspensions, which don't occur too often. (This example is a bit simplified.) But I can say from my observations that the memory footprint stays constant. I tested another similar computation that used 1000000 suspensions. It ran very fast, consuming only a very little memory. –  Petr Pudlák Mar 11 '13 at 9:35
    
"Am I right saying that this going to re-create closure instance on every factorial call": No, a closure is only created when suspending. When f calls itself, the call is indeed tail recursive and thus there is no further stack use (hence no stack overflow). –  Régis Jean-Gilles Mar 12 '13 at 9:31

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