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I need a minimum size implementation of an array of bools. The size of the array is known at compile time.

I checked std::bitset and boost::array, but they both incur an overhead that is significant for small arrays. For example, if the array size is 8, the container should only use 1 byte of memory (assuming common CPU architecture).

Does this exist or do I need to roll my own?

EDIT: Here is my final implementation based on the post of Tom Knapen. I added a default value for the constructor and added throwing in case of out-of-bounds index. Many thanks to Tom and everyone else.

#include <stdexcept>
#include <climits>

/// Minimum size container for bool-arrays
/**
 * TODO: may want to add to_uint32_t accessor and the like
 * for sufficently small arrays
 */
template<int SIZE>
class bitarray
{
public:
    bitarray(bool initial_value = false);

    bool get(int index) const;
    void set(int index, bool value);

private:
    static const int ARRAY_SIZE = (SIZE + CHAR_BIT - 1) / 8;
    unsigned char mBits[ARRAY_SIZE];
};

// ----------------------------------------------------
//      Definitions
// ----------------------------------------------------

template<int SIZE>
inline bitarray<SIZE>::bitarray(bool initial_value)
{
    for(int i = 0; i < ARRAY_SIZE; ++i)
        mBits[i] = initial_value ? -1 : 0;
}

template<int SIZE>
inline bool bitarray<SIZE>::get(int index) const
{
    if (index >= SIZE)
        throw std::out_of_range("index out of range");
    return (mBits[index / CHAR_BIT] & (1 << (index % CHAR_BIT)));
}

template<int SIZE>
inline void bitarray<SIZE>::set(int index, bool value)
{
    if (index >= SIZE)
        throw std::out_of_range("index out of range");
    if (value)
        mBits[index / CHAR_BIT] |= (1 << (index % CHAR_BIT));
    else
        mBits[index / CHAR_BIT] &= ~(1 << (index % CHAR_BIT));
}
share|improve this question
    
std:bitset should only use one bit per element (as std::vector<bool> does in some implementations). How did you check that it uses more? –  Frédéric Hamidi Mar 11 '13 at 11:37
    
@FrédéricHamidi if you do sizeof(std::vector<bool>) it returns 40 –  Tony The Lion Mar 11 '13 at 11:43
    
@Frédéric Hamidi: Using sizeof operator. This is part of the implementation, it uses dynamic allocation: _WordT *_M_wp; size_t _M_bpos; May be different for other std implementations –  Gabriel Schreiber Mar 11 '13 at 11:45
    
@Tony, that's its "static" size (an instance of std::vector<bool> weights 40 bytes even when empty). It does not take into account the heap memory allocated for the elements themselves. –  Frédéric Hamidi Mar 11 '13 at 11:45
    
@FrédéricHamidi right, but then that means adding elements will only make it larger, no? –  Tony The Lion Mar 11 '13 at 11:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is a simple example. Please note that it only does what it needs to, so you won't be able to iterate it like a std::bitset.

#include <climits>
#include <iostream>
#include <cassert>

template<int S> struct boolset {
    static int const SIZE = ((S / CHAR_BIT) + (0 != (S % CHAR_BIT)));
    unsigned char m_bits[SIZE];
public:
    boolset() : m_bits() { for(int i = 0; i < SIZE; ++i) m_bits[i] = 0; }

    bool get(int i) const {
        assert(i < S);
        return (m_bits[i / CHAR_BIT] & (1 << (i % CHAR_BIT)));
    }

    void set(int i, bool v) {
        assert(i < S);
        if(v) { m_bits[i / CHAR_BIT] |= (1 << (i % CHAR_BIT)); }
        else { m_bits[i / CHAR_BIT] &= ~(1 << (i % CHAR_BIT)); }
    }

    void print(std::ostream & s) const {
        for(int i = 0; i < S; ++i) {
            s << get(i);
        }
    }
};

int main(int argc, char ** argv) {
    std::cout << sizeof(boolset<1>) << std::endl;
    std::cout << sizeof(boolset<8>) << std::endl;
    std::cout << sizeof(boolset<9>) << std::endl;
    std::cout << sizeof(boolset<16>) << std::endl;
    std::cout << sizeof(boolset<17>) << std::endl;
    std::cout << sizeof(boolset<32>) << std::endl;
    std::cout << sizeof(boolset<33>) << std::endl;
    std::cout << sizeof(boolset<64>) << std::endl;
    std::cout << sizeof(boolset<129>) << std::endl;
    std::cout << std::endl;
    boolset<31> bs;
    bs.set(0, true);
    bs.set(28, true);
    bs.set(2, true);
    std::cout << bs.get(28) << std::endl;
    bs.print(std::cout); std::cout << std::endl;
    bs.set(2, false);
    bs.print(std::cout); std::cout << std::endl;
}

Output on ideone.

share|improve this answer
    
Learned something new: static members of course depend on template params. Didn't quite realize this before. –  Gabriel Schreiber Mar 11 '13 at 13:37

You can make it by your own, but not from scratch. bitset implementation should have a couple of lines looking like typedef unsigned long _WordT; (SGI) or typedef _Uint32t _Ty; (MSVS). You could carefully replace the type and namespace and make your own container this way. I changed the type to char and sizeof returns 1 (vs2010 proof-of-concept on pastebin)

share|improve this answer
template <int N>
class BitSet {
    enum { BPC = 8 }; // Bits per char, #ifdef as needed
    char m_bits[ (N + (BPC-1)) / BPC ];
public:
void SetBit( int i ) { m_bits[ i / BPC ] |= 1 << (i % BPC); }
void ClearBit( int i ) { m_bits[ i / BPC ] &= ~(1 << (i % BPC)); }
int GetBit( int i ) { return (m_bits[ i / BPC ] >> (i % BPC)) & 1; }
};
share|improve this answer

Maybe if you did something like this:

#include<vector>
#include <iostream>
template<int N>
struct array
{
   char bits : N;

   int getNthbit(int bitnr)
   {
      // important to make sure bitnr is not larger than the size of the type of `bits` in number of `CHAR_BITS` 
      return bits & (1 << bitnr);
   }
};

//Specialize for N > 8

int main()
{
   std::cout << sizeof(array<8>);
}

If you look at the Live Example, you'll see when N == 8 it returns 1 for sizeof(array<8>).

When you put in 32 it returns 4.

The only thing you'd need to do is specialize the template for N > 8 so that the type changes to fit the number of bits.

I'm no template genius, maybe someone cares to write an example?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, an array char[number_of_bits % 8] is basically what I have in mind as data structure. But I need accessors doing the bit shifting and was wondering if this exists already. –  Gabriel Schreiber Mar 11 '13 at 11:48
    
@GabrielSchreiber I have never seen it, but I can't imagine writing the accessors for bit N is hard. –  Tony The Lion Mar 11 '13 at 11:52
    
@TonyTheLion I am afraid this implementation will not work for N > 8, and it will certainly not work for N > 64. –  anatolyg Mar 11 '13 at 12:02
    
@anatolyg out of curiousity, what would be the problem? I'd like to learn from this. –  Tony The Lion Mar 11 '13 at 12:03
    
The expression 1 << bitnr is implementation-defined for large values of bitnr (large means that it overflows the int type). However, some tinkering with your Live Example shows that at least the sizeof output behaves well. –  anatolyg Mar 11 '13 at 12:12

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