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I'm just beginning with Cython and it also turns out very hard to google Cython-specific stuff, so sorry in advance.

I am re-implementing a Python function with Cython. It pretty much looks like this in Python:

def func(s, numbers=None):
    if numbers:
         some_dict = numbers
    else:
         some_dict = default
    return sum(some_dict[c] for c in s)

And it works fine on Python 2 and 3. But if I try to type s and c, it breaks on at least one of Python versions. I tried:

def func(char *s, numbers=None):
    if numbers:
         some_dict = numbers
    else:
         some_dict = default
    cdef char c
    cdef double m = 0.0
    for c in s:
        m += some_dict[<bytes>c]
    return m

This is the only thing I got to work at all, to be honest, and it gives a decent speedup on Python 2, but breaks on Python 3. Having read this piece of Cython docs, I thought the following would work on Python 3:

def func(unicode s, numbers=None):
    if numbers:
         some_dict = numbers
    else:
         some_dict = default
    cdef double m = 0.0
    for c in s:
        m += some_dict[c]
    return m

but it actually raises a KeyError and it seems like c is still a char (the missing key is 80 if s starts with a 'P') but when I print(type(c)) it says <class 'str'>.

Note that the original untyped code works under both versions but is about twice slower than the working typed version on Python 2.

So how do I make it work on Python 3 at all, and then how do I get it to work on both Python versions at once? Can/should I wrap type declarations in type/version checks? Or should I maybe write two functions and conditionally assign one of them to a publicly available name?

P.S. I'm okay with only allowing ASCII characters in the string if it matters, but I doubt that it does, as Cython seems to favor explicit encoding/decoding.


Edit: I have also tried explicit encoding and iterating over a bytestring, which would make sense, but the following code:

def func(s, numbers=None):
    if numbers:
         some_dict = numbers
    else:
         some_dict = default
    cdef double m = 0.0
    cdef bytes bs = s.encode('ascii')
    cdef char c
    for c in bs:
        m += some_dict[(<bytes>c).decode('ascii')]
    return m

is 3 times slower than my first attempt on Python 2 (close to the speed of the pure Python function) and almost 2 times slower on Python 3.

share|improve this question
    
There will be almost none speedup in do_stuff is python function. In this case you are just typed loop variable but not the work. Rewrite do_stuff in cython. It would be also helpfull if you provide info what do_stuff does and whats in some_dict values. –  Turnaev Evgeny Mar 12 '13 at 7:48
    
Regarding your KeyError - in C unicode usually maps to int type, so some_dict in this case must be C hash with int keys (or maybe more right Py_UNICODE type). But again, i bet bottleneck is in do_stuff. –  Turnaev Evgeny Mar 12 '13 at 7:51
    
@TurnaevEvgeny do_stuff is arithmetics on numbers from some_dict. Basically, it's calculating the sum of values from some_dict corresponding to keys from s. I typed the sum variable, so there is some speedup. So the question is how to cythonize the loop itself. –  Lev Levitsky Mar 12 '13 at 8:15
    
It is still alot unclear for me. Post some more code with example data. If you are mapping value to any char in range 255 - then just use array instead of dict. What a func should return? –  Turnaev Evgeny Mar 12 '13 at 9:15
    
@TurnaevEvgeny It's not any char, just a subset of ascii uppercase. But still making a (sparse) array sounds like a sane idea. The value returned is the calculated sum. –  Lev Levitsky Mar 12 '13 at 10:40

1 Answer 1

foo.h

// #include <unistd.h>  // for ssize_t
double foo(char * str, ssize_t str_len, double weights[256]){
    double output = 0.0;
    int i;
    for(i = 0; i < str_len; ++i){
        output += weights[str[i]];
    }
    return output;
}

from cpython.string cimport PyString_GET_SIZE, PyString_Check, PyString_AS_STRING

cdef extern from "foo.h": double foo(char * str, ssize_t str_len, double weights[256])

cdef class Numbers: cdef: double nums[256] def _ cinit _(self, py_numbers): for x in range(256): self.nums[i] = py_numbers[i]

def py_foo(my_str, Numbers nums_inst): cdef: double res # check here my_str is BYTEstring if not PyString_Check(my_str): raise TypeError("bytestring expected got %s instead" % type(my_str)) res = foo(PyString_AS_STRING(my_str), PyString_GET_SIZE(my_str), nums_inst.nums) return res

(untested)

share|improve this answer
    
I would suggest relatively the same if you want hash. But with hashes class Numbers would have C++ map (or any C hash) member. –  Turnaev Evgeny Mar 12 '13 at 12:54
    
This is a very interesting and useful example, thank you. But the missing part about checking what my_str is is pretty much what I initially asked, so unfortunately I can't accept the answer yet (although you can count on a +1 from me). –  Lev Levitsky Mar 12 '13 at 13:06
    
I just added check, but certainly i wasn't thinking your original question to be about type checking. –  Turnaev Evgeny Mar 12 '13 at 13:24
    
The difference between Python 2.x and 3.x is that type str is actually ascii bytestring under 2.x and a unicode string under 3.x, which can be ignored when iterating over an ascii string in pure Python, but got me stuck when moving to Cython. –  Lev Levitsky Mar 12 '13 at 13:36
    
Your solution to checking the string type seems to be Python2-specific (although helpful concept-wise). Python 3 API has PyBytes_Check and PyUnicode_Check. Can I somehow check which of them are defined? Maybe just wrap the import in a try/except? –  Lev Levitsky Mar 12 '13 at 13:49

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