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I have a value in a cell that's in bytes. But nobody can read 728398112238. I'd rather it say 678.37GB

To write a formula to format it relatively easy (here's one: http://www.yonahruss.com/2007/02/format-excel-numbers-as-gb-mb-kb-b.html)

But is there any way to do this as a 'format'? I'd like to have the big number in the cell, but have it display as the human-readable format.

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1  
Quick note if at all you're interested in stuff like this: "kB" is standard (lowercase 'k', not upper case). Sources: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilobyte en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilo- If you aren't interested, please ignore my post :) – PonyEars Mar 22 '13 at 2:00
    
The link in this post is dead. Here is another link to a solution using a formula: social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/… – Joost Nov 19 '15 at 6:24
up vote 47 down vote accepted

You can't really do calculations in the formatting features of excel. You can use something like the following to do a rough estimation though

[<500000]#,##0" B ";[<500000000]#,##0,," MB";#,##0,,," GB"

Update: new link as other seems to have become obsolete (although I was able to click on it still) http://excel-answers.com/microsoft/Excel/34882622/using-comma-to-scale-large-numbers.aspx

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1  
Wow .. you've confirmed my suspicion that I can't do calculations .. but your solution is genius! I'll use that or something close to. Thanks! – RickMeasham Oct 7 '09 at 22:36
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For regional settings with ' ' as thousand-separator and ',' as comma-separator: [<500000]# ##0" B ";[<500000000]# ##0 " MB";# ##0 " GB" – Grastveit Apr 25 '13 at 11:52
2  
The eggheadcafe website says "The page you requested was removed." – RyPeck Jul 25 '13 at 18:47

Here is one that I have been using: -

[<1000000]0.00," KB";[<1000000000]0.00,," MB";0.00,,," GB"

Seems to work fine.

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1  
not perfect (multiples of 1000 vs 1024), but good enough & upvoted. thanks! – Kevin Cogill Sep 10 '12 at 23:08
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Kevin: kB/MB/GB is really correct with multiples of 1000 only (as defined by SI, used by Mac & hard-drives). I guess this doesn't change that you want 1024 (more correctly written KiB/MiB/GiB, as used in Linux GUIs) so just pointing out that it's Windows that maintains this historic and confusing notation. The binary notation was standardised last century, so it's high-time they got with the program. ;-) – Luke Usherwood Jun 29 '14 at 16:52
    
Or if you want bytes, KB, and MB instead of KB,MB,GB: [<1000]#" B";[<1000000]0.00," KB";0.00,," MB" – Aaron Campbell Apr 5 at 18:43

Slight change to make it work on my region (. as thousands separator, comma as decimal separator): [<1000000]#.##0,00" KB";[<1000000000]#.##0,00.." MB";#.##0,00..." GB"

Still same issue on data conversion (1000 != 1024) but it does the job for me.

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Though Excel format conditions will only display 1 of 3 conditions related to number size (they code it as "positive; negative; zero; text" but I prefer to see it as : if isnumber and true; elseif isnumber and false; elseif number; elseif is text )

so to me the best answer is David's as well as Grastveit's comment for other regional format.

Here are the ones I use depending on reports I make.

[<1000000]#,##0.00," KB";[<1000000000]#,##0.00,," MB";#,##0.00,,," GB"

[>999999999999]#,##0.00,,,," TB";[>999999999]#,##0.00,,," GB";#.##0.00,," MB"

[<1000000]# ##0,00 " KB";[<1000000000]# ##0,00  " MB";# ##0,00   " GB"

[>999999999999]# ##0,00    " TB";[>999999999]# ##0,00   " GB";# ##0,00  " MB"

Take your pick!

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I don't know of a way to make it show you binary gigabytes (multiples of 1024*1024*1024) but you can make it show you decimal gigabytes using a format like:

0.00,,,"Gb"
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After seeing the answers here just improved on this formula to have decimal places on bigger values and cater for negative values.

=IF(A1<999500000000,TEXT(A1,"#,##.#0,,,"" TB"""),
IF(A1<-9995000000,TEXT(A1,"#,##.#0,,,"" GB"""),
IF(A1<-9995000,TEXT(A1,"#,##0,,"" MB"""),
IF(A1<-9995,TEXT(A1,"#,##0,"" KB"""),
IF(A1<-1000,TEXT(A1,"#,##0"" B """),
IF(A1<0,TEXT(A1,"#,##0"" B """),
IF(A1<1000,TEXT(A1,"#,##0"" B """),
IF(A1<999500,TEXT(A1,"#,##0,"" KB"""),
IF(A1<999500000,TEXT(A1,"#,##0,,"" MB"""),
IF(A1<999500000000,TEXT(A1,"#,##.#0,,,"" GB"""),
TEXT(A1,"#,##.#0,,,,"" TB""")))))))))))
share|improve this answer
    
The original question included details on using a formula. But it's about using a number format. Your solution is very similar to the linked one except you deal with negative numbers. Rather than include them in separate IF statements, use ABS() to get the absolute value. – RickMeasham Dec 18 '15 at 1:53

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