Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

Is there a quicksort, or another O(N.logN) sort, available in the jdk standard library?

Collections class doesn't bring hope:

Implementors should feel free to substitute other algorithms, so long as the specification itself is adhered to. (For example, the algorithm used by sort does not have to be a mergesort, but it does have to be stable.)

and Collections.sort() gives no clue:

sort(List<T> list) Sorts the specified list into ascending order,according to the natural ordering of its elements.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by DwB, Brent Worden, guerda, Sam I am, mindas Mar 11 '13 at 16:28

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
1  
@JonathanDrapeau thanks for pointing that out, I remember reading about the Timsort but had forgotten about it: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timsort, always impressive to see such innovations pop up in recent years (2002) –  Christophe Roussy Mar 11 '13 at 12:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Sorting relies on Arrays.sort. As the sort method depends on the type, reading the JavaDoc is not so obvious. A modified merge sort or a tuned quicksort depending on a threshold:

 /**
 * Tuning parameter: list size at or below which insertion sort will be
 * used in preference to mergesort or quicksort.
 */
private static final int INSERTIONSORT_THRESHOLD = 7;

Here is a post comparing quicksort and mergesort: Quick Sort Vs Merge Sort

Conclusion: trust the Java implementation unless you really know what you are doing.

share|improve this answer

Collections.sort is an optimized merge sort which actually guarantees O(n log n) in every case and it is stable; link .

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.