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Here is what I have the formula I have to compute for each element of my Numpy matrices :

Mi_j = Sum_v(Av * Xi_v) + Sum_v(Bv * Wj_v) + Sum_v(Gv * Zij_v)

I don't really see how to code it in a numpy way (in python it's too long) : vectorized / slicing / C Api.

What would you suggest and can you give me a simple example ? I'm new to numpy.

@Edited indices

  • A, B, G are arrays of one dimension [x,x,x]
  • same for Xi and Wj (X is a Matrix, W is a Matrix)
  • Zij is an array of one dimension
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Does Sum(Av * Xi_v) mean you are summing over the v index? If so, what does Sum(Gu * Zij_v) mean? –  unutbu Mar 11 '13 at 13:09
    
...and is u also an index? –  askewchan Mar 11 '13 at 13:11
    
I've edited in the message. –  Touki Mar 11 '13 at 13:21
    
Are the inputs X and W as full matrices, and Z as a full 3d array, as assumed in the formula, or are they Xi, Wj, and Zij as 1d arrays as listed at the end? My answer allows full arrays. –  askewchan Mar 11 '13 at 17:53
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Let's work through a simple example:

If we define:

import numpy as np
N = 5
A = np.arange(N)
X = np.arange(N*N).reshape(N,N)

B = np.arange(N)
W = np.arange(N*N).reshape(N,N)

G = np.arange(N)
Zij = np.arange(N)

Then the first sum, Sum_v(Av * Xi_v) can be computed with np.dot:

In [54]: X
Out[54]: 
array([[ 0,  1,  2,  3,  4],
       [ 5,  6,  7,  8,  9],
       [10, 11, 12, 13, 14],
       [15, 16, 17, 18, 19],
       [20, 21, 22, 23, 24]])

In [55]: A
Out[55]: array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4])

In [56]: np.dot(X, A)
Out[56]: array([ 30,  80, 130, 180, 230])

Similarly, the second sum, Sum_v(Bv * Wj_v) can be computed as:

In [58]: np.dot(W,B)
Out[58]: array([ 30,  80, 130, 180, 230])

However, we want the first sum to result in a vector varying along the i-index, while we want the second sum to result in a vector varying along the j-index. To arrange that in numpy, use broadcasting:

In [59]: np.dot(X,A) + np.dot(W,B)[:,None]
Out[59]: 
array([[ 60, 110, 160, 210, 260],
       [110, 160, 210, 260, 310],
       [160, 210, 260, 310, 360],
       [210, 260, 310, 360, 410],
       [260, 310, 360, 410, 460]])

The third sum is a simple dot product between two 1-dimensional arrays:

In [60]: np.dot(Zij, G)
Out[60]: 30

So putting it all together,

In [61]: M = np.dot(X,A) + np.dot(W,B)[:,None] + np.dot(Zij, G)

In [62]: M
Out[62]: 
array([[ 90, 140, 190, 240, 290],
       [140, 190, 240, 290, 340],
       [190, 240, 290, 340, 390],
       [240, 290, 340, 390, 440],
       [290, 340, 390, 440, 490]])

Note I might have misunderstood the meaning of Zij. Although you say it is a 1-dimensional array, perhaps you meant that for each i,j it is a 1-dimensional array. Then Z would be 3-dimensional.

For the sake of concreteness, let's say the first two axes of Z represent the i and j-indices, and the last axis of Z is the one you wish to sum over.

In this case, you'd want the last term to be np.dot(Z, G):

In [13]: Z = np.arange(N**3).reshape(N,N,-1)

In [14]: np.dot(X,A) + np.dot(W,B)[:,None] + np.dot(Z, G)
Out[14]: 
array([[  90,  190,  290,  390,  490],
       [ 390,  490,  590,  690,  790],
       [ 690,  790,  890,  990, 1090],
       [ 990, 1090, 1190, 1290, 1390],
       [1290, 1390, 1490, 1590, 1690]])
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as a nitpick: any specific reason you're using None for a newaxis? (great answer, +1 regardless) –  Zhenya Mar 11 '13 at 15:29
    
This assumes that Z_ij is constant for all i and j, which in general it's not. –  askewchan Mar 11 '13 at 17:14
    
@askewchan: Thanks, you are probably right. I've edited my post accordingly. By the way, although the matrix class makes the first two terms look nicer, you wouldn't be able to use the matrix class for Z if Z is 3-dimensional. Z = np.asmatrix(...reshape(N,N,N)) throws a ValueError. –  unutbu Mar 11 '13 at 19:58
1  
Personally I'd rather keep my matrices as a matrix because then I can't accidentally do A*X as it gives a warning since the innermost indices do not have the same dimension. The strictish typing does help prevent mistakes, and allows for outer products, etc without as much though (for me). –  askewchan Mar 11 '13 at 20:19
1  
I prefer working with plain ndarrays, not matrices, since matrices only work in 2 dimensions. Although it makes some expressions read more like math, the notation is not generalizable. I'd rather not write functions that assume my inputs are two-dimensional. –  unutbu Mar 11 '13 at 22:28
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I would personally find it more readable determine the algebraic process, and then use numpy matrices to do them as standard. If your work is at all mathematical, it will be much easier to convert math to code and vice versa if you use the numpy matrix class.

This will also help you avoid having to broadcast carefully.

Starting with:

Mi_j = Sum_v(Av * Xi_v) + Sum_v(Bv * Wj_v) + Sum_v(Gv * Zij_v)

Which in numpy becomes:

M = X*A + (W*B).T + Z*G

If you initialize each matrix as a np.matrix, proper algebra is done automatically.

import numpy as np
N = 5

A = np.asmatrix(np.arange(N)).T
B = np.asmatrix(np.arange(N)).T
G = np.asmatrix(np.arange(N)).T

X = np.asmatrix(np.arange(N*N).reshape(N,N))
W = np.asmatrix(np.arange(N*N).reshape(N,N))

Z = np.asmatrix(np.arange(N**3).reshape(N,N,N))

Note that I've transpose'd the 1d matrices, since a 1d matrix is a row vector by default. True vectors are column vectors. After that you no longer need to worry about broadcasting.

M = X*A + (W*B).T + Z*G
print M
[[  90  190  290  390  490]
 [ 390  490  590  690  790]
 [ 690  790  890  990 1090]
 [ 990 1090 1190 1290 1390]
 [1290 1390 1490 1590 1690]]
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