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I have a button called 'create project', when user click the button, i want 2 things to happen

  1. an ajax call to check if the user is allow to create a project
  2. if allowed, then execute the button as normal, if not, then pop up a modal dialog saying he is not allowed to create a new project.

I have the following code

$('.create_project').click(function(e) {
   e.stopDefault();
   $.getJSON('/check_user_limit', function(data){
        if(data.allow_to_create_project){
           //trigger the click here
        }else{
           //modal here
        }
    }
});

use 'trigger' in the above code won't work since it become a infinite loop. The unbind works the first time, but won't work the second time since the foo no longer bind to the function.

share|improve this question
1  
What exactly are you trying to accomplish? This seems rather bass-ackwards, and there's probably a better way to do it. –  Matt Ball Oct 7 '09 at 20:25
    
You just want the event to bubble up so that the click happens as though you didn't do anything? Then just do 'return true' at the end of your event handler. –  James Black Oct 7 '09 at 20:26
    
I don't think you should be attaching and triggering a click in the same method. Can't you attach the click somewhere else? –  Davy Oct 7 '09 at 20:27
1  
this element that you're clicking, its an anchor (link)? And you want to change something in the link path before you actually follow the link? If that's true, it seems like fishy behavior. As a web user, I'd be upset if the link I clicked on changed when I clicked on it and therefore sending me to a different place than I was expecting (if this is even possible) –  Matt Oct 7 '09 at 20:29

4 Answers 4

It's pretty simple, you just do the following:

$('.foo').click(function(e) {
   $(this).href = "/bar"; # done something else before the click

   return true;
});

If you want to intercept the click event and not propagate it then simply return false instead. I noticed you made your example more explicit, but the solution is still somewhat similar. Instead of returning true to propagate the event, we manually trigger the click while telling the click function to swallow the event by returning false. The code would then look something like this:

$('.create_project').click(function(e) {
   $.getJSON('/check_user_limit', function(data) {
        if (data.allow_to_create_project) {
           e.click();
        } else {
           //modal here
        }
   }
   return false;
});

However, making an AJAX request to verify whether a feature is usable is usually not a good idea. If the server already knows that the user cannot create a project, then why is the button clickable in the first place? Update the control with the appropriate state instead.

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thanks, but since i need to issue an ajax call, so I need to e.preventDefault first, 'return true' won't work after 'e.preventDefualt. –  user169930 Oct 7 '09 at 21:17

I'm not sure why you wouldn't want to just do:

$('.foo').click(function(e) {
    $(this).href = "/bar";
});
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I'm sort of confused. You mention unbinding yet there is no actual unbinding of events in the actual code.

If you're just trying to execute some code pre-click of an element, you're going about it the wrong way.

$('.foo').click(function(e)
{
    $(this).href = "/bar";
    return true; // this is implicit, but you could return false to cancel the event
});

If you're trying to do something else, then I would advocate using two separate events, with one of them being a custom event name.

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Why bother with client-side code for this?

From a usability standpoint it would be better to check user permissions with server-side code, and, if there's a problem, have a message next to the disabled button by the time the page loads. This message would also mention what can be done in order to enable project creation for this user.

Sometimes you just have to evaluate if a particular tool is even necessary for achieving an objective.

share|improve this answer
    
i have the check in server-side, the client side is only try to give a nice user experience to have a modal dialog. –  user169930 Oct 7 '09 at 21:02
    
Modal dialogue does not always equal nice user experience. Since you're checking server side, why not utilize that check and give feedback immediately, instead of making the user make an extra query? –  dalbaeb Oct 9 '09 at 20:24

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