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I have a code congaing two functions func1 and func2. Role of both the function is same. Keep reading a directory continuously and write the names of file present in their respective log files. Both functions are referring a common log function to write the logs. I want to use introduce threading in my code such that both of them keep on running parallely but both should not access the log function at same time. How to achieve that?

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1  
What have you tried? Also read more about the thread functionality in C++, especially std::thread and std::mutex. –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 11 '13 at 13:14
    
Short answer: pthreads or Microsoft's WinAPI threads. Or Boost::Threads. –  slugonamission Mar 11 '13 at 13:14
    
look synchronization mechanism i.e. mutex etc –  Saqlain Mar 11 '13 at 13:15
    
I tried pthread_create(&thread1, NULL, start_opca, &opca); pthread_join( thread1, NULL); pthread_create(&thread2, NULL, start_ggca, &ggca); pthread_join( thread2, NULL); But the problem with this is that it will wait for one thread to finish before starting next. I don't want that. –  sajal Mar 11 '13 at 13:16
    
One more thing. I am running it on a linux platform. –  sajal Mar 11 '13 at 13:17

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

From Sajal's comments:

tried pthread_create(&thread1, NULL, start_opca, &opca); pthread_join( thread1, NULL); pthread_create(&thread2, NULL, start_ggca, &ggca); pthread_join( thread2, NULL);

But the problem with this is that it will wait for one thread to finish before starting next. I don't want that.

the join function blocks the calling thread, until the thread you call join for, finishes. In your case, calling join on the first thread before creating the second, guarantees that the first thread will end before the second one begins.

You should create the two threads first, then join them both (instead of interspersing the creations and join of both).

Additionally, the access to the log should be extracted into common code for both (a logging function, a logging class etc. Within the extracted code, the log access should be guarded using a mutex.

If you have an implementation (partially) supporting c++11, you should use std::thread and std::mutex for this. Otherwise, you should use boost::thread. If you have access to neither, use pthreads under linux.

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Exactly I am looking for something like that. But very new to this. So could you please tell me how to join them both. –  sajal Mar 11 '13 at 13:35
    
if you have std::thread t1(functor1), t2(functor2); then do t1.join(); t2.join();. –  utnapistim Mar 11 '13 at 13:53

This is a classic case of needing a mutex.

void WriteToLog(const char *msg)
{
   acquire(mutex);
   logfile << msg << endl;
   release(mutex);
}

The above code won't "copy and paste" into your system, since mutexes are system specific - pthread_mutex would be the choice if you are using pthreads. C++11 has it's own mutex and thread functionality, and Windows has another variant.

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Thanks..You answered one part of my question. My another question is since both the functions are using a while (true) loop to read their respective directories continuously, I can't use pthread_join as it would wait for first thread to terminate and that would never happen. If I dont use pthread_join, code reaches the end of main and terminates. –  sajal Mar 11 '13 at 13:29

On linux, you will need to use pthreads

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Since both threads are reading/writing from/to I/O (reading dirs and writing log files) there's no need for multi-threading: you gain no speed improvement parallelizing the task since every I/O access is enqueued at lower levels.

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This C language Code may give you some hint. To answer your question: You should use mutex in pthread to make sure that the log file could only be access by one thread at the same time.

#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>
pthread_mutex_t LogLock = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;
char* LogFileName= "test.log";
void* func_tid0( void* a) {
  int i;
  for(i=0; i < 50; i++ ) {
    pthread_mutex_lock(&LogLock);
    fprintf((FILE*)a, "write to log by thread0:%d\n", i);
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&LogLock);
  }
}

void* func_tid1(void* a) {
  int i;
  for(i=0; i < 50; i++ ) {
    pthread_mutex_lock(&LogLock);
    fprintf((FILE*)a, "write to log by thread1:%d\n", i);
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&LogLock);
  }
}
int main()  {
  pthread_t tid0, tid1;
  FILE* fp=fopen(LogFileName, "wb+");
  pthread_create(&tid0, NULL, func_tid0, (void*) fp );
  pthread_create(&tid1, NULL, func_tid1, (void*) fp );
  void* ret;
  pthread_join(tid0, &ret);
  pthread_join(tid1, &ret);
}
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Your another question isn't exist. Because the main thread is suspend at your first pthread_join, but it's not mean the second thread doesn't run. Actually the second thread is beginning at pthread_create(thread1).

And actually pthread_mutex casuses your program serial.

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