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tl;dr: Loading a non-blocking, but non-terminating thread prevents the main thread from running.

I have an app which is monitoring the contents of a number of log files. These log files are passed in as command-line arguments, so the initialisation looks like:

app = load_gui() # instantiates a wx.App object

for arg in sys.argv[1:]:
    # error check
    wt = WatchThread(stuff) # threading.Thread subclass
    wt.run()

app.MainLoop() # loads the GUI - never called

The actual run method on the WatchThread is doing the following:

def run(self):
    cmd = subprocess.Popen('tail -f "%s"'%filename, shell=True,                 
                           stdout=subprocess.PIPE) 

    for line in cmd.stdout:
        process_line(line)

Testing in a separate script shows that the for loop in the WatchThread run method is not a busy wait / spinlock. It may (and indeed should) be automatically sleeping at the OS level. I've tried adding manual sleep calls to the loop, but to no avail.

Running this thread (via wt.run()) is preventing the actual app load (app.MainLoop()). Given that the problematic for loop is on a different thread, why would this be happening?

(As a side note, I tried using the watchdog module for this sort of monitoring, but it wasn't giving consistent, reliable, or prompt notifications of file modification. In testing, tail -f worked as desired.)

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closed as too localized by millimoose, Robᵩ, Inbar Rose, Emil, Cylian Mar 12 '13 at 14:43

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4  
I might be terribly mistaken, but you don't seem to be actually starting your thread. You're just calling WatchThread.run() directly on the main thread. You should call start() instead. –  millimoose Mar 11 '13 at 13:41
3  
I'm an idiot >< –  sapi Mar 11 '13 at 13:44
    
Funny, I made the same mistake a few days ago. –  Fenikso Mar 11 '13 at 13:46