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I have a program that opens files based on the char **argv command line arguments. Here's the logic:

char * openErrorString = "Error opening file: ";
FILE *fp1 = fopen(*++argv, "r");
if (fp1 == NULL) {
    perror(openErrorString);
    return 1;
}   
FILE *fp2 = fopen(*++argv, "r");
if (fp2 == NULL) {
    perror(openErrorString);
    return 1;
}

The problem is, I later want to compare the two files and give meaningful output when lines in the files do not match. Here's the code I wrote for that:

while (fgets(fp1Line, max, fp1) != NULL &&
        fgets(fp2Line, max, fp2) != NULL) {
    if (strcmp(fp1Line, fp2Line)) {
        printf("%s\n","Line discrepancy found:");
        printf("%s: %s\n", argv[1], fp1Line);
        printf("%s: %s\n", argv[2], fp2Line);
        fclose(fp1);
        fclose(fp2);
        return 0;
    }
}

However, when I call argv[1] in my printf statement, I get (null), i.e., the final entry in argv. When I call argv[2], I get TERM_PROGRAM=Apple_Terminal. I have no idea what that is. What appears to be happening is that because I incremented the argv pointer twice when accessing it to open the files, argv now starts at the second command line argument. Is there a good way to reset this behavior other than doing two lines of *argv-- after I open the files?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is no reason to change the argv pointer if you need it again. Instead, replace

FILE *fp1 = fopen(*++argv, "r");

by

FILE *fp1 = fopen(argv[1], "r");

and

FILE *fp2 = fopen(*++argv, "r");

by

FILE *fp2 = fopen(argv[2], "r");
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My advice would be to not modify argv. Make a copy of the pointer into another variable, and increment that. This way you can use argv again and again and not worry about where it's pointing right now.

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Just don't increment argv, on example:

FILE *fp1 = fopen(argv[0], "r");
// ...
FILE *fp2 = fopen(argv[1], "r");
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