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Say I have a list of orders I want to display. I want to give the user the ability to show all orders, all orders from a certain state, and all orders from a certain category. Each of these can be filtered by a date range.

Without worrying about routing, I might just add each on the query string:

/orders?State=TX&Category=Books&DateRange=Yesterday

While I could easily make this work, it doesn't "feel" like this is the correct MVC-way of doing things.

I could have routes that look something like this:

/orders/              
/orders/state/{state}
/orders/category/{category}
/orders/state/{state}/category/{category}/
/orders/state/{state}/category/{category}/Date/{date-range}

But I'd still want to support each of those filters not being there. Is there a better way of handling this or am I just over thinking the whole thing?

If I go the URL only path, it isn't clear how I would create these routes without just repeating them for all the combinations I would want (state, no category, date, state, no category, no date, no state, category, date, etc.)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's actually a common practice to leave search/filter options in query parameters, look on google for instance.
From my point of view, unless you care about seo on filter results or want to have human friendly urls for this page, the is no point in supporting routes for any possible filter.

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I think the query parameter version is fine for MVC. What's probably confusing you is that, when you want to give the user a page for a specific order, you do put the order_id in the page. So where in a traditional website, you'd just make that URL

/order.html?order_id=1234

(or whatever), with MVC you want to use

/orders/1234

instead. The difference is, you only want to put mandatory parameters --- those that the page would break without --- in the URL; not every parameter. You can't return an order page without an order id, so that goes in the URL.

You can have both on a page; for a silly example, if you had a shipping tracking page for an order, you could have a URL like

/orders/1234/tracking?since=9%3a00

to only show tracking events (arrived at, departed at) since 9:00am.

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