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There is Task.Delay in .NET 4.5

How can I do the same in .NET 4.0?

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2  
Thread.Sleep? – Default Mar 11 '13 at 15:07
    
Have a look here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh194845.aspx Or use Thread.Sleep and add a reference to using System.Threading; – Max Mar 11 '13 at 15:08
    
possible duplicate: stackoverflow.com/q/4990602 – Default Mar 11 '13 at 16:57
3  
@Default, for using Sleep() the task should have always: 1)spawned a separate thread, and 2)only one. No less and no more and 3)it cannot be reused. Nothing of this holds for a task. It is not a dupe, your link is about delaying a the start of a task. My question is about putting it to sleep at any moment after its start – Fulproof Mar 11 '13 at 17:30
6  
Using Thread.Sleep in your code is almost always a bug. – Eli Arbel Mar 12 '13 at 9:11
up vote 45 down vote accepted

You can use a Timer to create a Delay method in 4.0:

public static Task Delay(double milliseconds)
{
    var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();
    System.Timers.Timer timer = new System.Timers.Timer();
    timer.Elapsed+=(obj, args) =>
    {
        tcs.TrySetResult(true);
    };
    timer.Interval = milliseconds;
    timer.AutoReset = false;
    timer.Start();
    return tcs.Task;
}
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thanks, I didn't specify but I am trying to add multithreading to my WPF application. Should I use there the Timer with Callback argument? And in Callback() definition use Dispatcher.BeginInvoke()? – Fulproof Mar 12 '13 at 3:40
    
@Fulproof You're not performing any UI interaction when the timer fires, so there's no reason to. – Servy Mar 12 '13 at 14:06
1  
how to add cancellationToken to it, which Task.Delay provides? – Imran Rizvi Jul 11 '13 at 16:29
2  
Doesn't this create a race condition? If the timer object would happen to get garbage collected before the timer expires, it seems that TrySetResult would never get called. – Edward Brey Sep 16 '13 at 13:58
7  
@EdwardBrey The Timer class specifically handles this internally to ensure that users of it don't need to hold onto a reference to it for it's lifetime. As long as the timer is currently running it adds a reference to itself from a rooted location and then removes it when it's no longer running. – Servy Sep 16 '13 at 14:01

Use the Microsoft.Bcl.Async package from NuGet, it has TaskEx.Delay.

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using System;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Delay(2000).ContinueWith(_ => Console.WriteLine("Done"));
        Console.Read();
    }

    static Task Delay(int milliseconds)
    {
        var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();
        new Timer(_ => tcs.SetResult(null)).Change(milliseconds, -1);
        return tcs.Task;
    }
}

From the section How to implement Task.Delay in 4.0

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3  
I added the example to your answer, in case the link goes dead for some reason. – Default Mar 11 '13 at 15:20
2  
@Fulproof He wrote is using LinqPad, which adds an extension method to object that prints the value of it's ToString method out. Note that he doesn't use that, nor any other non-library methods in his actual implementation, just the example function that tests it out. – Servy Mar 11 '13 at 20:52
    
@Servy, thanks. I asked the question in order to reduce the number of the unknowns (and getting answers) but not adding puzzles to resolve. I.e. a person who asks usually does not have expertise to complete the puzzle – Fulproof Mar 12 '13 at 3:20
1  
Updated, so you can just copy-paste and run ) – QrystaL Mar 12 '13 at 9:10
    
Shouldn't the Timer be disposed? – Amit G Mar 2 at 11:56

Below is the code and sample harness for a cancellable Task.Delay implementation. You are likely interested in the Delay method.:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace DelayImplementation
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            System.Threading.CancellationTokenSource tcs = new System.Threading.CancellationTokenSource();

            int id = 1;
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Starting new delay task {0}. This one will be cancelled.", id));
            Task delayTask = Delay(8000, tcs.Token);
            HandleTask(delayTask, id);

            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(2000);
            tcs.Cancel();

            id = 2;
            System.Threading.CancellationTokenSource tcs2 = new System.Threading.CancellationTokenSource();
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Starting delay task {0}. This one will NOT be cancelled.", id));
            var delayTask2 = Delay(4000, tcs2.Token);
            HandleTask(delayTask2, id);

            System.Console.ReadLine();
        }

        private static void HandleTask(Task delayTask, int id)
        {
            delayTask.ContinueWith(p => Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Task {0} was cancelled.", id)), TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnCanceled);
            delayTask.ContinueWith(p => Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Task {0} was completed.", id)), TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion);
        }

        static Task Delay(int delayTime, System.Threading.CancellationToken token)
        {
            TaskCompletionSource<object> tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();

            if (delayTime < 0) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("Delay time cannot be under 0");

            System.Threading.Timer timer = null;
            timer = new System.Threading.Timer(p =>
            {
                timer.Dispose(); //stop the timer
                tcs.TrySetResult(null); //timer expired, attempt to move task to the completed state.
            }, null, delayTime, System.Threading.Timeout.Infinite);

            token.Register(() =>
                {
                    timer.Dispose(); //stop the timer
                    tcs.TrySetCanceled(); //attempt to mode task to canceled state
                });

            return tcs.Task;
        }
    }
}
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You can download the Visual Studio Async CTP and use TaskEx.Delay

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4  
That's not a good idea, the CTP contains known bugs that will never be fixed. Using Bcl.Async is a much better choice. – svick Nov 15 '13 at 12:20

In many cases, a sheer AutoResetEvent is better than a Thread.Sleep()...

AutoResetEvent pause = new AutoResetEvent(false);
Task timeout = Task.Factory.StartNew(()=>{
pause.WaitOne(1000, true);
});

hope that it helps

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