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I'm sure this is a duplicate, but the keywords for my search are too common... I get a lot of hits, for things I'm not looking for. I'm coming from C#, and Java generics seem to be a bit behind the .NET implementation, so this is pretty frustrating for me.

I have an abstract class BaseRepository like so:

public abstract class BaseRepository<T, K> implements Repository<T, K> {

    private Class<T> type;
    private Class<K> keyType;

    public BaseRepository(Class<T> clazz, Class<K> kClazz) {
        type = clazz;
        keyType = kClazz;
    }

    protected Class<T> getType() {
        return type;
    }

    protected Class<K> getKeyType(){
        return keyType;
    }
}

Now I want to derive from my base class with an EmployeeRepository like so:

public class EmployeeRepository extends BaseRepository<Employee, UUID>{

}

With c#, I would not need to make such heroic efforts to instantiate the base class, but it seems java's implementation of generics requires you to pass the generic type(s) in the constructor.

So how do I create a parameterless constructor for my EmployeeRepository class that instantiates the base class with an entity type of Employee and a key type of UUID? I want to be able to write this:

EmployeeRepository foo = new EmployeeRepository();

... and have it instantiate the abstract class with Class<Employee> and Class<UUID>.

share|improve this question
    
why do you want to have the 'type' and 'keyType' fields? –  Fortega Mar 11 '13 at 15:18
    
I need to reference the types in other methods of the base class. –  Jeremy Holovacs Mar 11 '13 at 15:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

AFAIK, there is no way round this other than invoking the superclass constructor from the default subclass constructor thus:

public EmployeeRepository() {
    super(Employee.class, UUID.class);

    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
...well that looks promising. I was not aware you could do that. –  Jeremy Holovacs Mar 11 '13 at 15:21
    
+1 no need for heroic efforts –  tjameson Mar 11 '13 at 15:24
    
This worked, and it's easy to implement. Thanks! –  Jeremy Holovacs Mar 11 '13 at 15:34

You could use reflection to determine the type of the generic arguments.

public abstract class BaseRepository<T, K> implements Repository<T, K> {

    private Class<T> type;
    private Class<K> keyType;

    public BaseRepository() {
        Type[] actualTypes = ((ParameterizedType) getClass().getGenericSuperclass()).getActualTypeArguments();
        this.type = (Class<T>)actualTypes[0];
        this.keyType = (Class<K>)actualTypes[1];
    }

    protected Class<T> getType() {
        return type;
    }

    protected Class<K> getKeyType(){
        return keyType;
    }
}

However, the real question is: why do you want to have the types?

share|improve this answer
    
There could be lots of reasons why the class objects are needed. Most likely, there is a need to construct new instances of the class from inside the generic base class. –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 11 '13 at 15:24
    
There are several methods in my base repository class that require the class type of the entity as an argument. From what I've read, reflection is generally frowned upon for this sort of thing, although I don't know why. Is there any advantage/ disadvantage to doing it this way vs. Oli's answer? –  Jeremy Holovacs Mar 11 '13 at 15:26
    
This approach needs some work to operate correctly (e.g. you cannot assign a Type to a Class<T>, this will not work if we're creating a sub-subclass). –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 11 '13 at 15:33
    
The advantage is that you don't have to call the super() on all objects implementing this... The disadvantages of my solution: 1) if you do a change on the (number of / order of) generic types of the BaseRepository, the code will be broken, but only at runtime. 2) getActualTypeArguments only returns the type arguments for the immediate class. So if you have a bigger hierarchy, this will not work. I would go for Oli's solution in most cases :-) –  Fortega Mar 11 '13 at 15:34
    
Thanks for the explanation. –  Jeremy Holovacs Mar 11 '13 at 15:43

As an alternative, use the Builder pattern:

public class EmployeeRepository extends BaseRepository<Employee, UUID>{
   public static EmployeeRepository newInstance() {
       return new EmployeeRepository(Employee.class, UUID.class);
   }
   ...
}

EmployeeRepository foo = EmployeeRepository.newInstance();
share|improve this answer
    
You'd still need a subclass ctor in order to pass these params through to the superclass ctor, though... –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 11 '13 at 15:25
    
Of course, but it helps hide the implementation details. You could also make the constructor of the base class (and sub-classes) protected. –  Chris Knight Mar 11 '13 at 15:26

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