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I have a <div> with overflow:hidden, and height:100% which displays the div contents on the screen and fits to the height of the window.

This works with Chrome, and Safari.

IE9, doesn't respect my div overflow:hidden and height:100% so it just expands the div to display the content.

On my page I have the following doctype

<!DOCTYPE HTML>

This should indicate the compliance with the latest standards.

If I remove the Doctype completely then everything works fine in all the browsers, except the fonts are too big because there isn't a doctype specified.

Any reason this might be happening? html and body tags are specified as height:100% in css stylesheet

<div style="overflow:hidden;height:100%">
content too tall to fit height of the screen, so a scroll bar is added.  In IE9 it doesn't work because it just extends the height of the DIV
</div>

Edit: I have included full HTML that can completely replicate the problem in IE9

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
   <head>
     <style>
      * { /* Resetting the defaults */
          margin: 0;
          padding: 0;
      }

      html, body { /* Assigning Height To Containers First */
          height: 100%;
      }

      table
      {
        height:100%;
        width:100%;
        border-collapse: collapse  
      }

      .headerRow
      {
        height:50px;
      }

      .sidePanelTd
      {


      }

      .sidePanelDiv
      {
        overflow:auto;
        height:100%;
      }

      .row2
      {

      }

     </style>
</head>
<body style="background-color:White;overflow:auto">
    <table border=0 cellpadding=0 cellspacing=1 id="mainTable">
    <tr class="headerRow">
        <td valign=top colspan=2>Header
        </td>
    </tr>

    <tr class="row2">
        <td>
        td 1
        </td>

        <td class="sidePanelTd">
           <div class="sidePanelDiv">
              td 2 content <br>too <br>tall <br><br><br><br><br><br>
              <br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>
              <br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>
              <br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>to fit height of the screen, 
              so a scroll bar is added.  In IE9 it doesn't work because it just extends 
              the height of the DIV
            </div>
        </td>
    </tr>

</table>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
can we see a fiddle? That might help us solve your problem! –  Akshay Khandelwal Mar 11 '13 at 15:26
    
What is a fiddle? –  user1060500 Mar 11 '13 at 15:26
    
@user1060500: JSFiddle –  James Donnelly Mar 11 '13 at 15:27
    
Ok Milche, thanks for pointing out this (technical) mistake which adds absolutely no value to what we're trying to solve here. –  user1060500 Mar 11 '13 at 15:31

3 Answers 3

This is what I've tried and it works

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
   <head>
     <style>
      * { /* Resetting the defaults */
          margin: 0;
          padding: 0;
      }

      html, body { /* Assigning Height To Containers First */
          height: 100%;
      }
     </style>
</head>
<body>
   <div style="overflow:hidden;height:100%">
      content <br>too <br>tall <br><br><br><br><br><br>
      <br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>
      <br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>
      <br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>to fit height of the screen, 
      so a scroll bar is added.  In IE9 it doesn't work because it just extends 
      the height of the DIV
    </div>
</body>
</html>

As you commented, you should add this

table, tr, td {
    height: 100%;
    border-collapse: collapse;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm. The only difference I have really is that I have a table with height:100% and tr with height:100% that the div is inside. Could the problem be the table? –  user1060500 Mar 11 '13 at 15:42
    
@user1060500 See my answer I added –  Mr. Alien Mar 11 '13 at 15:45
    
Ok, I'm working on replicating your solution and then comparing any differences with what I have. I will let you know as my HTML is a little more complex, but the basics are the same. –  user1060500 Mar 11 '13 at 15:48
    
@user1060500 Sure.. –  Mr. Alien Mar 11 '13 at 15:49
    
Ok, I can replicate the problem. I revised my question to include source HTML to replicate based on your example. One difference you'll see is that there are two TR's in my example with the first one being a header tr. What do you think? –  user1060500 Mar 11 '13 at 16:25

Maybe something on your page is triggering quirksmode, try setting <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge" /> (from this post) or you may find some hints on this page.

share|improve this answer
    
I updated my question with full HTML source and the problem exists still. I am wondering if you can replicate it? –  user1060500 Mar 11 '13 at 16:50

It seems like it should work.Make sure there are no comments or any sort of code above the DOCTYPE declaration because that too makes IE go into quirks mode. Also add the <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge" /> just to be safe.

share|improve this answer
    
I updated my question with full HTML source and the problem exists still. I am wondering if you can replicate it? –  user1060500 Mar 11 '13 at 16:49

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