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Can anyone enlighten me as to why this code isn't working?

  • I pass in char * pointers to my split function and split my buffer up.
  • Allocate memory on the heap for each arg (char *) that was passed in,
  • then do a strcpy the substring into this new buffer.
  • It all works fine until I return from the method and try and print any of the variables.
  • Segmentation failure
void split(char * buffer, int num, ...)
{
  char* string;
  char* tofree;
  string = strdup(trim(buffer));

  if (string != NULL) {
    tofree = string;

    va_list arguments; 

    //Initializing arguments to store all values after num 
    va_start ( arguments, num );           

    int i = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < num; i++ )        
    {
        //Item is the final store place of the split substring
        char * arg = va_arg ( arguments, char *);

        //Split the strings, delimiter is space
        char * splitBuffer = strsep(&string, " ");

        //Allocate the buffer memory to store the splitBuffer
        arg  =  malloc(sizeof(char*)*strlen(splitBuffer));

        strcpy(arg ,splitBuffer);
        printf("Buffer [%s] -- [%s]n", buffer, arg);
    }
    va_end ( arguments ); // Cleans up the list


    free(tofree);
  }
}




        char * a;
        char * b;
        char * c;
        split(buffer,3,a,b,c);
        printf("Print A = %s B = %s C = %s\n", a,b,c);
share|improve this question
1  
You'll probably need to send in a pointer to a, b and c, then deref when assigning in your loop. Currently, it's changing your your local pointer (a copy), no the actual pointer. –  tjameson Mar 11 '13 at 15:29
    
Please re-indent the code, converting tabs to spaces... Whenever you paste code to SO, make sure it contains no tabs, because those make a mess. –  hyde Mar 11 '13 at 15:30
    
But (a,b,c) are all char * so they are pointers already? Though your right it does some to make a copy some where and thus a outside the function is never changed. –  Ciarán Mar 11 '13 at 15:32
    
@hyde ah that's what that is, will edit now. Thanks –  Ciarán Mar 11 '13 at 15:33
1  
No, a char* is a pointer to a char, or a char array. You want a pointer to a char array, or a char**. That way you can change where the char* is in memory. –  tjameson Mar 11 '13 at 15:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

@tjameson means this, I think:

  void split(char * buffer, int num, ...)
  {
     char* string;
     char* tofree;
     string = strdup(trim(buffer));

     if (string != NULL)
     {
        tofree = string;

        va_list arguments; 

        //Initializing arguments to store all values after num 
        va_start ( arguments, num );           

        int i = 0;
        for (i = 0; i < num; i++ )        
        {
           //Item is the final store place of the split substring
           char ** arg = va_arg ( arguments, char **);

           //Split the strings, delimiter is space
           char * splitBuffer = strsep(&string, " ");

           //Allocate the buffer memory to store the splitBuffer
           *arg  =  malloc(sizeof(char*)*strlen(splitBuffer));

           strcpy(*arg ,splitBuffer);
           printf("Buffer [%s] -- [%s]\n", buffer, *arg);
        }
        va_end ( arguments ); // Cleans up the list

        free(tofree);
     }
  }


    char * a;
    char * b;
    char * c;
    split(buffer,3,&a,&b,&c);
    printf("Print A = %s B = %s C = %s\n", a,b,c);

It should work fine.

share|improve this answer
    
Yup. I was working on a working solution, but I was having trouble getting the current example working. +1 from me. Except va_arg needs to take a char**. –  tjameson Mar 11 '13 at 15:38
    
Yes that worked, thanks very much! –  Ciarán Mar 11 '13 at 15:39

In C, pointers are passed by value. If you pass a pointer to a function, then and change its value - the address of the object it points to - within that function, it doesn't propagate to the original pointer like C++ references would.

Here, malloc will change the address pointed to by arg (being a, b or c), but only locally. The actual a, b and c (in say, main) will be left uninitialised. Your compiler would probably warn you about that.

Use double-indirection when passing those pointers:

split(buffer,3, &a, &b, &c);

...and the proper code in your split function, e.g.:

char **arg = va_arg ( arguments, char ** );
*arg = malloc(...);
// etc.
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