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Hi I am having some trouble I have a very simple script task in SSIS. This is the first time i used LINQ

string iFileName = (string)(Dts.Variables["iFileName"].Value);
string oFileName = (string)(Dts.Variables["oFileName"].Value);

try
{
   // string[] lines = File.ReadAllLines(@"\\Fcwdsqlanl01\e$\SQL_OLAP\Log\Billing_2.log");

    IEnumerable<string> stringsOut = File.ReadAllLines(iFileName)
          .Where(line => (char.IsDigit(line, 0)) && line.Contains(","))
          .Select(line => line);

    File.WriteAllLines(oFileName, stringsOut);
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    MessageBox.Show(e.Message);
}

this is the error I am getting

The best overloaded match for 'System.IO.File.WriteAllLines(string, string[])' has som invalid arguments.

I dont understand why its having a problem with the argument since I used it the same way as ReadAllLines. Ive already checked and the stringsOut variable is holding the array of strings I want. I realize there are ways of doing this not using WriteAllLines but I want to do that assuming Im missing something simple.

share|improve this question
1  
You may need to use the overload that takes a String[] (just call ToArray() at the end) since the IEnumerable<string> overload was new in .NET 4. What framework version are you using? –  Tim Schmelter Mar 11 '13 at 16:07
    
I'll never understand why people use SSIS and do all of the work in a script task –  msmucker0527 Mar 11 '13 at 16:09
1  
Your Select method isn't doing anything; it should just be removed. –  Servy Mar 11 '13 at 16:28
    
@msmucker and how would you do this specific taks without a script component? Would you use the built in "Run through file and format it before sending to connection manager" Component? –  Mike_L Mar 11 '13 at 19:44
    
Thanks Servy that I will do –  Mike_L Mar 11 '13 at 19:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

WriteAllLines expects a string[] as its second argument, while you pass an IEnumerable<string>. That IEnumerable<string> could refer to a string[], but could also refer to any other type also implementing IEnumerable<string>.

This should work:

File.WriteAllLines(oFileName, stringsOut.ToArray());
share|improve this answer
    
"In this particular case that IEnumerable<string> happens to refer to a string[]," I cannot agree with this statement. The stringsOut variable does not reference a string[] at all. –  juharr Mar 11 '13 at 16:10
    
@juharr: so correct! I was rethinking that sentence while writing it and had a concurrency issue in my brain, one might say. Will correct it promptly. –  Fredrik Mörk Mar 11 '13 at 16:12
    
I used this one –  Mike_L Mar 12 '13 at 15:50

Which version of .Net are you compiling for? The WriteAllLines overload which accepts an IEnumerable<string> as the second parameter wasn't added until .Net 4.0. The method exists in 3.0 but only has the overload which takes a string[] as the second parameter.

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Although you are doing a ReadAllLines, you are applying LINQ filters, which transforms this to an IEnumerable<string>.

Try changing your code to something like

IEnumerable<string> stringsOut = File.ReadAllLines(iFileName)
                  .Where(line => (char.IsDigit(line, 0)) && line.Contains(","))
                  .Select(line => line)
                  .ToArray();
share|improve this answer

The best overloaded match for 'System.IO.File.WriteAllLines(string, string[])'

I assume you are below .NET 4, WriteAllLines with IEnumerable<string> was new in .NET 4.

So just use the array version:

string[] stringsOut = File.ReadAllLines(iFileName)
    .Where(line => (char.IsDigit(line, 0)) && line.Contains(","))
    .Select(line => line)
    .ToArray();
File.WriteAllLines(oFileName, stringsOut);
share|improve this answer

The method File.WriteAllLines does take string array as the second parameter and not a string

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1  
File.WriteAllLines takes a string[] as second parameter. Was the "not" unintentional here? –  Default Mar 11 '13 at 16:11
    
Yes, I did not mean to type 'not' there. Thanks mate –  this. Mar 11 '13 at 16:17

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