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I have a css conflict, so I have to go against an absolute positioning property that deals with some class 'myclass'. But in one case, I want a div with 'myclass' class to have a no absolute positioning. So I put 'position : initial', which works in chrome, but is it cross-browser ? I googled it and found nothing really precise

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

The initial keyword was introduced in 2011 in the Cascading and Inheritance Module -- it's supported in FF 19+, Chrome, Safari, Opera 15+ but is currently not supported in any version of IE.

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Ah, it is a new generic keyword, that explains why it wasn't listed in the css positioning spec (that spec, I assume, hasn't been updated since it was added) –  Quentin Mar 11 '13 at 16:27
    
@Quentin: It says "Initial: static" in its propdef. The term "initial value" has been in use since CSS1 to mean something like "the spec default value for this property if unspecified." –  BoltClock Mar 11 '13 at 17:06
    
@BoltClock — This answer, while describing the right thing, linked to the wrong thing. I followed links to find it, but it is talking about the initial keyword not the initial value. I've edited the answer to point to the correct place. –  Quentin Mar 11 '13 at 17:07
    
@Quentin: I know - I'm simply stating that the keyword was introduced to allow access to the long-existent concept of an initial value. –  BoltClock Mar 11 '13 at 17:12
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The default for position is position: static;

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Even IE 11 gives me the 'squiggles' for this one. Changing to static gave me the desired behavior.

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Chrome actually suggests it as an acceptable property in its dropdown

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