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I would like to copy certain lines of text from one text file to another. In my current script when I search for a string it copies everything afterwards, how can I copy just a certain part of the text? E.g. only copy lines when it has "tests/file/myword" in it?

current code:

#!/usr/bin/env python
f = open('list1.txt')
f1 = open('output.txt', 'a')

doIHaveToCopyTheLine=False

for line in f.readlines():

    if 'tests/file/myword' in line:
        doIHaveToCopyTheLine=True

    if doIHaveToCopyTheLine:
        f1.write(line)

f1.close()
f.close()
share|improve this question
2  
Indent your code properly. – Ashwini Chaudhary Mar 11 '13 at 16:37
    
@AshwiniChaudhary don't be afraid to flag these questions as low-quality. – omouse Mar 11 '13 at 16:41
2  
or.. better yet... just click edit. – Steven Almeroth Mar 11 '13 at 16:42
    
The problem with your code: you have to reset the flag on each iteration of the loop. – ATOzTOA Mar 11 '13 at 16:46
up vote 23 down vote accepted

The oneliner:

open("out1.txt", "w").writelines([l for l in open("in.txt").readlines() if "tests/file/myword" in l])

Recommended with with:

with open("in.txt") as f:
    lines = f.readlines()
    lines = [l for l in lines if "ROW" in l]
    with open("out.txt", "w") as f1:
        f1.writelines(lines)

Using less memory:

with open("in.txt") as f:
    with open("out.txt", "w") as f1:
        for line in f:
            if "ROW" in line:
                f1.write(line) 
share|improve this answer
    
cool! that's smells functional style 101% :) – VB9-UANIC Mar 11 '13 at 16:41
    
@ATOzTOA thank you for the code and explaining the problem. – DevCon Mar 11 '13 at 16:51
    
Thumbs down for me... this code creates a second list before writing. Its not scalable. Neither readlines() nor a list comprehension creating a second list should be used. – tdelaney Mar 11 '13 at 17:05
    
@tdelaney Updated answer... – ATOzTOA Mar 11 '13 at 17:16
    
@ATOzTOA - I like that fix! – tdelaney Mar 11 '13 at 17:24

readlines() reads the entire input file into a list and is not a good performer. Just iterate through the lines in the file. I used 'with' on output.txt so that it is automatically closed when done. That's not needed on 'list1.txt' because it will be closed when the for loop ends.

#!/usr/bin/env python
with open('output.txt', 'a') as f1:
    for line in open('list1.txt'):
        if 'tests/file/myword' in line:
            f1.write(line)
share|improve this answer

Just a slightly cleaned up way of doing this. This is no more or less performant than ATOzTOA's answer, but there's no reason to do two separate with statements.

with open(path_1, 'a') as file_1, open(path_2, 'r') as file_2:
    for line in file_2:
        if 'tests/file/myword' in line:
            file_1.write(line)
share|improve this answer
f = open('list1.txt')
f1 = open('output.txt', 'a')

# doIHaveToCopyTheLine=False

for line in f.readlines():
    if 'tests/file/myword' in line:
        f1.write(line)

f1.close()
f.close()

Now Your code will work. Try This one.

share|improve this answer

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