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Consider the following example code:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
  istreambuf_iterator<char> eos;
  istreambuf_iterator<char> iit(cin.rdbuf());
  int i;
  for (i = 0; iit != eos; ++i, ++iit) {
    cout << *iit;
  }
  cout << endl << i << endl;
}

And an input file containing the following: "foo\xffbar":

$ hexdump testin
0000000 66 6f 6f ff 62 61 72
0000007

Now for the test using clang libc++ vs gnu libstdc++:

$ make test
clang++ -std=c++11 -stdlib=libc++ -Wall -stdlib=libc++ -o bug-libcc bug.cpp
clang++ -std=c++11 -stdlib=libc++ -Wall -stdlib=libstdc++ -o bug-libstd bug.cpp
./bug-libcc < testin
foo
3
./bug-libstd < testin
foo�bar
7

As you can see the libc++ version thinks the 0xff is the end of stream and it stops reading. So this leads to a couple of questions.

1) Is this a bug in libc++ that I should report? My google searches for existing bugs have turned up nothing.

2) Is there a good way to work around this issue?

EDIT

The following code works:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
  ifstream ifs ("testin", ios::binary);
  istreambuf_iterator<char> eos;
  istreambuf_iterator<char> iit(ifs.rdbuf());
  int i;
  for (i = 0; iit != eos; ++i, ++iit) {
    cout << *iit;
  }
  cout << endl << i << endl;
}

Leading me to believe that it is a binary conversion issue, but that doesn't explain why libstdc++ works properly.

EDIT2

Using a file without binary works fine too:

ifstream ifs ("testin");

So there is definitely something fishy going on. It looks like it might be an issue in the implementation of cin though, not the iterator.

share|improve this question
2  
try doing the output as int(*iit), it could also be that cout is in a badstate after outputting 0xff –  PlasmaHH Mar 11 '13 at 17:09
    
@PlasmaHH unlikely; it's outputting i with the surrounding endls. –  ecatmur Mar 11 '13 at 17:23
    
@PlasmaHH: really, wouldn't that prevent 3 from bein output through cout on the last line? –  Mats Petersson Mar 11 '13 at 17:24
    
@PlasmaHH a) I've tried this without using cout in the middle. b) I don't see how messing up cout would cause (iit == eos) to become true which clearly happens. Note the value of i. –  vishvananda Mar 11 '13 at 17:26
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Unfortunately there is still a bug in libc++ (in addition to the one ecatmur pointed out). Here is the fix:

Index: include/__std_stream
===================================================================
--- include/__std_stream    (revision 176092)
+++ include/__std_stream    (working copy)
@@ -150,7 +150,7 @@
     {
         for (int __i = __nread; __i > 0;)
         {
-            if (ungetc(__extbuf[--__i], __file_) == EOF)
+            if (ungetc(traits_type::to_int_type(__extbuf[--__i]), __file_) == EOF)
                 return traits_type::eof();
         }
     }

I will get this checked in asap. Sorry for the bug. Thanks for bringing it to my attention.

Fix Committed revision 176822 to the libcxx public svn trunk. The fix requires a re-compiled dylib even though the fix is in a header.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks like the right answer. I am investigating how I can rebuild my dylib to check it out. –  vishvananda Mar 11 '13 at 20:03
    
On OS X you can test out a new libc++.dylib within a shell by doing: export DYLD_LIBRARY_PATH="<path to newly built libc++.dylib>". This is much safer than actually replacing /usr/lib/libc++.1.dylib. See libcxx.llvm.org for more information. –  Howard Hinnant Mar 11 '13 at 20:07
    
I just built from current svn and tried this: export DYLD_LIBRARY_PATH=/Users/vishvananda/libcxx/lib clang++ -std=c++11 -Wall -g -stdlib=libc++ -nostdinc++ -I/Users/vishvananda/libcxx/include -L/Users/vishvananda/libcxx/lib -o bug-libcc bug.cpp I'm getting the same problem. Not sure if there is something wrong with my build. I've tried sticking some random exception throwing nearby in __std_stream and it doesn't look like it is being picked up. Suggestions? –  vishvananda Mar 11 '13 at 20:26
    
nvm, I got it. had to set DYLD_LIBRARY_PATH when running the built file. –  vishvananda Mar 11 '13 at 20:41
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I think you might have found a bug that has already been fixed. This commit (by @Howard Hinnant) contains the following changes:

@@ -104,7 +104,7 @@
     int __nread = _VSTD::max(1, __encoding_);
     for (int __i = 0; __i < __nread; ++__i)
     {
-        char __c = getc(__file_);
+        int __c = getc(__file_);
         if (__c == EOF)
             return traits_type::eof();
         __extbuf[__i] = static_cast<char>(__c);
@@ -131,7 +131,7 @@
                 if (__nread == sizeof(__extbuf))
                     return traits_type::eof();
                 {
-                    char __c = getc(__file_);
+                    int __c = getc(__file_);
                     if (__c == EOF)
                         return traits_type::eof();
                     __extbuf[__nread] = static_cast<char>(__c);

You'll notice that the older version stored the return value of getc into char, which is a no-no for the precise reason that it confuses the char value 0xff with the int value EOF (i.e., -1).

The bug applies only to cin because the affected methods are on __stdinbuf, which is the type libc++ uses to implement cin only; ifstream e.g. uses basic_filebuf<char>.

Check the libcxx/include/__std_stream file on your system to see whether it has this bug; if it does, apply the patch and it should fix it.

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I think @HowardHinnant has the correct answer. Trying to verify –  vishvananda Mar 11 '13 at 20:05
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The iterator is extracting from the stream.
The stream needs to be opened with binary mode to prevent any translations to the original data.

Next, don't use char. The char type can be signed, unsigned or not either, depending on the compiler. I recommend using uint8_t when reading binary octets.

Try something like this:

#include <cstdint>
using std::uint8_t;
istreambuf_iterator<uint8_t> eos;
share|improve this answer
    
So the binary conversion is definitely part of it. Note the edit above using a binary ifstream. It still seems like there is something weird going on in libc++ implementation though. –  vishvananda Mar 11 '13 at 17:48
    
It doesn't seem to be binary conversion. See EDIT2 above. –  vishvananda Mar 11 '13 at 18:40
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