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I have 5 binary files(raster) with the same dimensions: the first four files represent parameter 1 and the fifth file represents land cover map with 10 classes.I want to calculate the average of all the four files based on the land cover classes. So finally we will get 4 values correspond to each class.

I tried this for all files:

  dir1<- list.files("C:\filesh", "*.img", full.names = TRUE)
  fre <- file("C:\\landover_from Suj1440a.bin","rb")
  sdf<- readBin(fre, integer(), size=1,  n=1440*720, signed=F)
  results<- list()
 for (.files in seq_along(dir1)){
   list1 <- readBin(dir1[.files], numeric(), size = 4, n = 1440*720, signed = TRUE)   
   list1=tapply(list1, sdf, mean, na.rm=TRUE)
   results[[length(results) + 1L]]<- list1}

It seems that it worked without errors.: to write the results :

  for (i in seq_along(results)){
  write.table(results[[i]], paste("C:\\Users\\filesh\\data", ".txt", sep=""),append=TRUE)}

I will get one text files having all the results like......

 x
  1     0.2
  2     0.5
  3     0.2
 x
 1      0.1 
 2      0.5
 3      0.6

4-I would like the output to be one text file having all the results like:

             1    2    3    4   5   6  7 ...
 x            0.2 0.5   0.2  .   .   .  . ...
 x            0.1  0.5  0.6
 x            .    .    .   .   .    .  . ...
 x            .

from my search I found that I need to write them as dataframe to get what I am looking for.Any help.

share|improve this question
    
@geektrader why you always downvote?I did but how we do this as I have outputs from different files. –  Jonsson Sali Mar 11 '13 at 17:36
    
How do you know @geektrader downvoted you?! –  Simon O'Hanlon Mar 11 '13 at 17:44
    
It's impossible to really know who downvoted unless they come right out and say it. Accusing other users of doing things they might not have done would only guarantee you that they won't help you in the future! Read the R tag wiki and its documentation carefully. For SO purposes, do also read the very last link about making a reproducible example very carefully. When someone downvotes your question, don't automatically delete it. Instead, work on improving your question and give the person a chance to reverse their vote. And, welcome and good luck! –  Ananda Mahto Mar 11 '13 at 17:46
    
@AnandaMahto I did not think it was possible to know who downvoted you. Jonsson Sali it is disheartening to get downvoted (I got 9 downvotes for a question on meta, believe me I know!) but use it to improve. –  Simon O'Hanlon Mar 11 '13 at 17:48
    
@SimonO101, to my knowledge, it's not. Re-read my first sentence :) –  Ananda Mahto Mar 11 '13 at 17:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From your previous question, which you deleted for some reason, you can just use rbind:

> r= c(5,4,5,4,2,5)
> s= c(5,4,5,4,2,5)
> rbind(r, s)
  [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]
r    5    4    5    4    2    5
s    5    4    5    4    2    5
> write.table(rbind(r, s), file = "myfile.txt")

Assuming that r and s are in a list named "results", which appears to be the case in this question see that:

> results <- list(r = r, s = s)
> results
$r
[1] 5 4 5 4 2 5

$s
[1] 5 4 5 4 2 5

> write.table(do.call(rbind, results), file = "myfile.txt")
share|improve this answer
    
30 seconds too slow :( –  EDi Mar 11 '13 at 17:36

So results seems to be a list... Why not doing some formatting/cleaning and the make one write.table call?

Here is an example, however since you did not supply a reproducible example it is likely that it will fail.

# create data
df <- read.table(header = TRUE, text = "'x'
'0' 0.16
'2' 0.15
'3' 0.16
'4' 0.10
'5' 0.18
'6' 0.02
'7' 0.11
'8' 0.06
'9' 0.07
'10' 0.17
'11' 0.06
'12' 0.07")

# make list
df_list <- list(df, df)


# merge columns
out <- do.call(cbind, df_list)
names(out) <- paste0('x', 1:ncol(out))

# transpose
out_t <- t(out)
write.table(out_t, 'data.txt')
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for "however since you did not supply a reproducible example it is likely that it will fail." :) –  Ananda Mahto Mar 11 '13 at 17:54

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