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I've got a setup of multiple images stacked on top of each other (image1 = normal icon, image2 = highlighted icon).

My objective is to highlight the icon, do processing, then set the icon back to normal. Also, to process as fast as possible. The bottleneck is the workarounds to get the "highlight" to show up.

To accomplish this, I'm just switching the .style.visibility = {"hidden", "visible"}

The behavior that I'm seeing is that only the latest style is shown, and it doesn't update until the function exits. From my research on SO, I've found the following:

  • Toggle the .style.visibility or .style.display off and on to force a redraw
    • Didn't see the correct behavior. Only the latest update shown
  • Use setTimeout(callback, 0) or setInterval(callback, 0)
    • Behaves as expected. However, due to the browser enforced "minimum wait time", the code is not executing as fast as I need it to.
    • The setInterval() function implementation requires that the function is called twice to perform one operation (once to highlight, second time to process then unhighlight)
    • I can upload code if necessary

I've attached a quick sample code to demonstrate that only the last style is shown

<!doctype html>
<head>
<title>test redraw</title>
</head>
<body>
    <img id="logo"
        src="data:image/png;base64, iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAAAUA
AAAFCAYAAACNbyblAAAAHElEQVQI12P4//8/w38GIAXDIBKE0DHxgljNBAAO
    9TXL0Y4OHwAAAABJRU5ErkJggg=="
        alt="Red dot from wikipedia" /></img>


    <script>
        function pausecomp(ms) {
            ms += new Date().getTime();
            while (new Date() < ms) {
            }
        }
        function hide_then_show() {
            var id = document.getElementById("logo");
            pausecomp(1000);
            id.style.display = "none";
            id.parentNode.style.display = "none";
            id.parentNode.style.display = "block";
            pausecomp(1000);
            id.style.display = "block";
            id.parentNode.style.display = "none";
            id.parentNode.style.display = "block";
        }

        window.addEventListener("click", hide_then_show());
    </script>
</body>
</html>

Any suggestions would be appreciated. I don't know if I'm approaching this the best way

share|improve this question
2  
Well i wouldnt use separate elements.. i would use a sprite image and just change the background position. –  prodigitalson Mar 11 '13 at 18:39
    
w3schools.com/css/css_image_sprites.asp –  Ben Mar 11 '13 at 18:53
    
That's how browsers work, first they execute a script, and then render a page. You can use setInterval() for the task. –  Teemu Mar 11 '13 at 19:09
    
prodigitalson and Ben: thanks for your suggestion. This will help optimize the page load, but it sees the same behavior as above –  cheezy Mar 11 '13 at 20:36
    
@Teemu I see. Unfortunately setInterval() and the browser's "minimum" delay causes the program to not run as fast as I need it to. I was hoping there was another way around it, but I guess not. Thanks! –  cheezy Mar 11 '13 at 20:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've a doubt you're not using setTimeout() correctly. Here's how you can make this work.

function hide_then_show() {
    var id = document.getElementById("logo");
    setTimeout(function () {
        id.parentNode.style.display = "none";
        setTimeout(function () {
            id.parentNode.style.display = "block";
        }, 1000); // Hiding time
    }, 1000); // Delay between click and hide
}
window.addEventListener("click", hide_then_show, false);

A working demo at jsFiddle. You can play with the fiddle and adjust delays, you'll see, how fast you can switch the image display.

If you need a blinker, you can check this fiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This is helpful and similar to what I had written. Performance is acceptable per element. But, it can get up to 100's of elements that need to be shown and hidden, and things get laggy. So, I'll take the approach of using less DOM elements (will use the image_sprite suggestion) in conjunction with this. –  cheezy Mar 13 '13 at 17:06

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