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I'm searching a solution for this for a few days now. Didn't find any question related enough to answer regrettably so here is my question. Consider the next code:

// dummy class A
class A {
public:
    void aFunction() { // <- this is the function I want to point at
        cout << "aFunction() is called\n";
    }
};

class B {
public:
    template <class Class> // get a function pointer
    void setFunction( void (Class::*func)() ) {
        p_func = func;
    }
    void (*p_func)(); // the function pointer
}

int main() {
    B obj;
    objb.setFunction(&A::aFunction);
    return 0;
}

I have a compilation error in setFunction() on p_func = func;:

cannot convert from 'void (__thiscall A::* )(void)' to 'void (__cdecl *)(void)'

And I don't seem to be able to get rid of it in any way. I know it has something to do with those invisible this pointers (__thiscall and __cdecl), but I don't know how to handle these. I tried making the member variable p_func a class template too (void (Class::*p_func)()) so it would have the same structure, but it that seems to be illegal to have 2 class templates in one class (why?), thus isn't the correct solution. This time the compiler complains about:

multiple template parameter lists are not allowed

This method (without the template) works perfectly on global functions (which is the workaround I currently use) and I saw the use of it in a library (sfgui), so it should be perfectly possible.

To have some context over why I'd want this: I'm trying to create a button. This button should be able to call whatever function I'd like. For now, I'd like it to call the start() function of an animation class I'm making.

p.s.: I know this example is useless since I can't run p_func: the function isn't static. I still need to add an object pointer (setFunction( void (Class::*func)(), Class* )), but that does not seem to be a problem. And I know about typedef to make a function pointer more readable, but not with a class template.


EDIT

After some more research I think the answer I need not the answer to this question, but rather another one. For once, I noticed that multiple template <class Class> is in fact allowed. However, it is not allowed on member variables since the compiler can't possibly know which class he'll need to use which probably is the reason for the error

multiple template parameter lists are not allowed

which is an odd description. Thanks anyway for the help, you did gave me a better insight.

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2  
A pointer to a member function is an entirely separate type from a pointer to a non-member function -- you can't mix the two (and to use a pointer to a member function, you need something like object.*pmf()). –  Jerry Coffin Mar 11 '13 at 18:51

2 Answers 2

You cannot convert a pointer-to-member Class::*func to a normal function pointer. They are of different types.

You should turn this:

void (*p_func)(); // the function pointer

into this:

void (class::*p_func)(); // the function pointer

You could also use a std::function<void()> and use boost::bind to bind it.

std::function<void()> fun = boost::bind(class::member_fun, args);

EDIT

What about making your B class a template so you can do this:

#include<iostream>

class A {
public:
    void aFunction() { // <- this is the function I want to point at
        std::cout << "aFunction() is called\n";
    }
};

template<class T>
class B {
public:
    void setFunction( void (T::*func)() ) {
        p_func = func;
    }
    void (T::*p_func)(); // the function pointer
    void callfunc()
    {
       (t.*p_func)(); //call pointer to member
    }
   private:
   T t; 
};

int main() {
    B<A> obj;
    obj.setFunction(&A::aFunction);
    return 0;
}

Live Example

share|improve this answer
    
I tried your first solution (as I've stated in my question). That would mean I'd need another template <class Class> ahead of the member variable declaration which is illegal according to the compiler. I'll try out the boost::bind-method. –  Didii Mar 11 '13 at 18:56
    
@Didii see my edit –  Tony The Lion Mar 11 '13 at 19:00
    
well I though of that too, but the button needs to have several function pointers: while hovering, while stop hovering, when clicked and when released. I can't let them all point to the same class. But I'll come back in a minute, for now I'm trying to install the boost libraries first :) Thanks already for the quick answer! –  Didii Mar 11 '13 at 19:06
    
Ok, I played a bit with the functions you gave me, but these seem to be not a lot different than the usual pointers I use. Since you still need the template <class Class> syntax which I can't use more than once per class... –  Didii Mar 11 '13 at 22:29
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I found the complete answer myself while searching for a way to save *objects of an unknown type without using templates or void pointers which has been answered here. The solution is a bit dodgy, because you'll have to create a dummy parent which allows for certain conversions.

The idea is that you create a Parent and every object that is allowed to be pointed to must inherit from it. This way you can create a pointer as Parent *obj which can hold multiple types of objects, but of course only classes that inherit from Parent.

The same applies for function pointers. If you define your pointer as void (Parent::*func)() as member variable. You can ask the user a template function pointer template <class Class> setFunction( void (Class::*f)() ), which can hold any pointer to any class. Now you need to cast the function pointer to the desired class, Parent: static_cast<void(Parent::*)()>(f). Mind that this only works when Class inherits from Parent. Otherwise you'll get a compilation error.

Minimal Working Example

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

// dummy class Parent
class Parent {};

// class A
class A : public Parent { // Mind the inheritance!
public:
    A(int n) : num(n) {}

    void print() {  // <- function we want to point to
        cout << "Number: " << num << endl;
    }

    int num;
}

// class B, will hold the 2 pointers
class B {
public:
    B() {}

    template <class Class>  // will save the function and object pointer
    void setFunction( void (Class::*func)(), Class *obj) {
        function = static_cast<void(Parent::*)()>(func);
        object = obj;
    }

    void execFunction() {  // executes the function on the object
        (object->*function)();
    }

    void (Parent::*function)(); // the function pointer
    Parent *object;             // the object pointer
}

int main() {
    A a(5);
    B b;

    b.setFunction(&A::print, &a);
    b.execFunction();

    return 0;
}

I don't really like this solution. A better solution would be that class B could have a function where it returns a bool when the function needs to be executed. This way you could simply place an if statement in the main-function that executes the desired function.

A a(5);
B b;
while (;;) {
    if (b.aTest())
        a.print();
}

Where B::aTest() is declared as

bool B::aTest();

Hope this helps anyone that comes across the same problem. So it is perfectly possible but pretty dodgy in my opinion, and I don't encourage people using the first method.

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