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I am defining a constructor in a class that takes in 5 arguments to initialize the fields. Two of those arguments/field come from a Date structure.

Information(string NewName, Date start, Date finish,
            double newNumber, double newLevel);

Is this the proper format for doing so?

Also, how would I go about inputting the arguments in int main () ? Something like this? How do I go about putting values into the structure arguments? Do they go into quotes?

Information arguments("Susan Jones", "3/5/5", "3/5/5", 15, 58);

Date structure:

 struct Date
  {
    int month;
    int day;
    int year;
  };
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1  
Could you please define "proper"? I'm not sure what you are asking. –  thiton Mar 11 '13 at 19:11
    
@thiton Ich meine, ist dies der richtige Weg es zu tun? –  Patrick Mar 11 '13 at 19:18
    
"Richtig" has many meanings and many viewpoints. A more concrete question would help. –  thiton Mar 11 '13 at 19:22
    
@thiton Ich fragte eine spezielle Frage in den Kommentaren unter dem ersten Antwort. –  Patrick Mar 11 '13 at 19:26
    
@user22507: What can you tell us about the constructors for the Date structure? There is no standard Date structure, so we can't tell you anything about it. (If it has no constructors, what members does it have?) –  Mooing Duck Mar 11 '13 at 19:31

2 Answers 2

It is better to pass const references to non-basic types used in the constructor. So make Data const& instead of just copies. To be more specific:

Information(const string& NewName,const Date& start,const Date& finish,
          double newNumber, double newLevel);

Also assuming that Date has a constructor taking an std::string or const char* the way you call the constructor is correct(although it seems you are calling the constructor of another class called Paycheck).

Otherwise the code seems reasonable.

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how do I go about inputting into the structure arguments? Do they go into quotes? –  Patrick Mar 11 '13 at 19:22
    
@user22507 no you simply call the constructor of the given argument so assuming Date has a constructor taking 3 ints as arguments you do: Information arguments("Susan Jones", Date(3,5,5), Date(3,5,5), 15, 58); –  Ivaylo Strandjev Mar 11 '13 at 19:30
    
@IvayloStrandjev: That depends entirely on the constructors of the Date class, and if it's implicitly constructable from a string. But what you suggest is more likely. –  Mooing Duck Mar 11 '13 at 19:32
    
@MooingDuck I said assuming Date has a constructor... So of course it does depend on the class Date –  Ivaylo Strandjev Mar 11 '13 at 19:34

The Information constructor you show looks reasonable. For medium or large objects, you might want to pass by const Date& instead of just Date, but for small/simple/fast objects like you have, making copies shouldn't be that big of a deal. Here's the "normal" way:

Information(const string& NewName, const Date& start, const Date& finish,
      double newNumber, double newLevel);

However, "3/5/5" is not the right way to construct an instance of Date. There's two ways, both shown below. The first is easier to understand, but the second is far less code.

Date start;
start.month = 3;
start.day = 5;
start.year = 5;

Date finish;
start.month = 3;
start.day = 5;
start.year = 5;

Information arguments("Susan Jones", start, finish, 15, 58);

or

Information arguments("Susan Jones", {3,5,5}, {3,5,5}, 15, 58);
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thank you -- how would I declare the constructor in the class? –  Patrick Mar 11 '13 at 21:24
    
@user22507: What? How would you declare what destructor in what class? –  Mooing Duck Mar 11 '13 at 22:48

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