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I have a data frame as follow:

V1 | V2
 1 | a,b,c
 2 | a,c
 3 | b,d
 4 | e,f
 . | .

Each of the alphabet is a character separated by comma. I would like to split V2 on each comma and insert the split strings as new rows. For instance, the desired output will be:

V1 | V2 
 1 | a
 1 | b
 1 | c
 2 | a
 2 | c
 3 | b
 3 | d
 4 | e
 4 | f
 . | .

I am trying to use strsplit() to spit V2 first, then cast the list into a data frame. It didn't work. Any help will be appreciated.

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3  
Please post the code you've tried so we can see where you may have gone wrong. –  Justin Mar 11 '13 at 19:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Here is another way of doing it..

df <- read.table(textConnection("1|a,b,c\n2|a,c\n3|b,d\n4|e,f"), header = F, sep = "|", stringsAsFactors = F)

df
##   V1    V2
## 1  1 a,b,c
## 2  2   a,c
## 3  3   b,d
## 4  4   e,f

s <- strsplit(df$V2, split = ",")
data.frame(V1 = rep(df$V1, sapply(s, length)), V2 = unlist(s))
##   V1 V2
## 1  1  a
## 2  1  b
## 3  1  c
## 4  2  a
## 5  2  c
## 6  3  b
## 7  3  d
## 8  4  e
## 9  4  f
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Here's a data.table solution:

d.df <- read.table(header=T, text="V1 | V2
1 | a,b,c
2 | a,c
3 | b,d
4 | e,f", stringsAsFactors=F, sep="|", strip.white = TRUE)
require(data.table)
d.dt <- data.table(d.df, key="V1")
out <- d.dt[, list(V2 = unlist(strsplit(V2, ","))), by=V1]

#    V1 V2
# 1:  1  a
# 2:  1  b
# 3:  1  c
# 4:  2  a
# 5:  2  c
# 6:  3  b
# 7:  3  d
# 8:  4  e
# 9:  4  f

> sapply(out$V2, nchar) # (or simply nchar(out$V2))
# a b c a c b d e f 
# 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 
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It appears that you would have to throw a gsub or something in there to strip whitespace with data.table too, but it's somewhat strange that it isn't visible in the output. print(as.data.frame(d.dt), quote=TRUE) shows that the whitespace is still there. +1 though. –  Ananda Mahto Mar 11 '13 at 20:16
    
Thanks. added strip.white = TRUE. –  Arun Mar 11 '13 at 20:21

Here is one approach using base R. It assumes we're starting with a data.frame named "mydf". It uses read.csv to read in the second column as a separate data.frame, which we combine with the first column from your source data. Finally, you use reshape to convert the data into a long form.

temp <- data.frame(Ind = mydf$V1, 
                   read.csv(text = as.character(mydf$V2), header = FALSE))
temp1 <- reshape(temp, direction = "long", idvar = "Ind", 
                 timevar = "time", varying = 2:ncol(temp), sep = "")
temp1[!temp1$V == "", c("Ind", "V")]
#     Ind  V
# 1.1   1  a
# 2.1   2  a
# 3.1   3  b
# 4.1   4  e
# 1.2   1  b
# 2.2   2  c
# 3.2   3  d
# 4.2   4  f
# 1.3   1  c

Another fairly direct alternative is:

stack(
  setNames(
    sapply(strsplit(mydf$V2, ","), 
           function(x) gsub("^\\s|\\s$", "", x)), mydf$V1))
  values ind
1      a   1
2      b   1
3      c   1
4      a   2
5      c   2
6      b   3
7      d   3
8      e   4
9      f   4
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+1 for showing how to use reshape –  Chinmay Patil Mar 11 '13 at 20:07

As of Dec 2014, this can be done using the unnest function from Hadley Wickham's tidyr package (see release notes http://blog.rstudio.org/2014/12/08/tidyr-0-2-0/)

> library(tidyr)
> library(dplyr)
> mydf

  V1 V2    V3
2  1  | a,b,c
3  2  |   a,c
4  3  |   b,d
5  4  |   e,f
6  .  |     .


> mydf %>% 
    mutate(V3 = strsplit(as.character(V3), ",")) %>% 
    unnest(V3)

   V1 V2 V3
1   1  |  a
2   1  |  b
3   1  |  c
4   2  |  a
5   2  |  c
6   3  |  b
7   3  |  d
8   4  |  e
9   4  |  f
10  .  |  .
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