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The raw sample data looks something like this:

neg      
test  
-1.0 1.0    
-2.1 3.45

and i have to convert it using flex into a recognized ocaml input list like this:

let test  
=[  
[ -1.0 ; 1.0 ; 1.0; -1.0 ];  
[ -2.1 ; 3.45 ; 1.0; -1.0 ]  
];;

I'm able to convert it as follows:

let test  
=[  
[ -1.0 ; 1.0 ; 1.0 ; ]; 
[ -2.1 ; 3.45 ; 1.0 ; ]
];;

The main question that i have is:

  1. How to put the last element in each list as -1 if raw data says neg and as 1 if raw data says pos?
share|improve this question
    
what's your code? how did you arrive at this result? –  CSᵠ Mar 11 '13 at 21:05
    
I'm not familiar with flex but I know that this is not possible in regular expressions; as I've argued many times before, you cannot magically make characters appear via substitution, if those characters didn't appear in the original text to begin with. –  Andrew Cheong Mar 11 '13 at 21:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think you need to add some form of parsing. Look into Bison for this, it integrates well with flex. So you get some rules looking something like this.

let_expression: "neg" identifier vector_list
{
//Finalize by printing stored data and add -1
}
              |  identifier vector_list
{
//Finalize by printing stored data and add 1
}

vector_list: vector_list vector
{
  //Store your number pairs in a std::vector<std::pair<T,T>>
}
           | vector
{
  //Initialize the vector list.
}

vector: const_num const_num
{
  //Store your numbers, maybe in a std::pair
  $$ = std::make_pair($1,$2)
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well I'm only allowed to use flex for this and not bison. I'm still not sure how to do this using flex. –  nmadhok Mar 12 '13 at 1:22
    
Why are you only allowed to use flex? –  AxelOmega Mar 12 '13 at 11:44

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