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So I'm writing this simple CLI tool, and without being too tedious with my code here's essentially what happens:

bool IsThing()
{
    // stuff goes here
    return false;
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    bool IsThing_ = IsThing();
    if ( IsThing_ )
    {
        printf( "foo\n" );
        return 1;
    }

    return 0;
}

When I run this code, I explicitly try to fail IsThing(), even removing literally everything in it except the return false. However, every single time, without fail, I'll get a return code of 1.

To debug, I've put breakpoints inside IsThing() and right before calling it in the body of _tmain(). The thing that frustrates me the most, is that at the breakpoint inside IsThing(), VS will tell me

No executable code is associated with this line.

When I step through the main function instead, it literally goes to bool IsThing_ = IsThing();, then checks the if condition without ever stepping into the actual function, and will just skip immediately to what's inside the conditional.

Why is my function call not working?

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2  
The call is probably inlined. Are you compiling in release mode? –  Luchian Grigore Mar 11 '13 at 20:17
2  
Check for #define macros? –  aschepler Mar 11 '13 at 20:20
2  
To build off of @Default, put in code that won't compile and verify that fails. –  Ryan Guthrie Mar 11 '13 at 20:23
1  
What happens if you replace the IsThing() definition with just a prototype, bool IsThing();? –  Michael Burr Mar 11 '13 at 20:33
1  
OK. Now if you put the IsThing() definition in another .cpp file does it work? –  Michael Burr Mar 11 '13 at 20:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're compiling with Release configuration that most likely uses /O1 or /O2 optimization, that is meant to make your code faster and smaller in size. This means that during the compilation this function:

bool IsThing() { return false; }

is being inlined, which leads to your main being equivalent to:

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    bool IsThing_ = false;
    if ( IsThing_ )
    {
        printf( "foo\n" );
        return 1;
    }
    return 0;
}

or even the body of the if statement might be omitted, which would lead to just:

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    return 0;
}

which is also the reason why with Debug configuration it works for you. You can try to go to the project properties and under C/C++ -> Optimization change Optimization option to Disabled (/Od) and you should be able to see, that after this change, your breakpoint will work for you :)

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Oh that's beautiful, it worked! But question - had I not known this, and worked completely in debug mode, and just built the thing in release and shipped it, wouldn't it run into errors during actual use? How do I stop this from happening in the future, aside from just disabling optimization every single time? –  jayjyli Mar 11 '13 at 20:59
    
@PhADDinTraining: Optimization will just make your code faster and smaller. It will never change the behavior of your code in terms of you being able to see different results (output etc.)... while working on your code, use Debug configuration, then when you want to release your application to the world, use Release. –  LihO Mar 11 '13 at 21:02
    
But as we've seen, Release will omit important code during optimization. Are you saying debugging in Release is different than an actual Release build? –  jayjyli Mar 12 '13 at 5:01
    
The question states (and verified in comments by @PhADDinTraining) that even with { return false; } it still goes inside the conditional and executes the printf. OK, the question as asked was phrased as "why does my function call not work", but I guess the real question should be why does it call printf when IsThing() returns false. That's why I asked for the real code, sounds like there might be a stray semi-colon at the end of the if() line, but it's just a guess without the real code. –  tinman Mar 12 '13 at 12:26
bool IsThing()
{
    // stuff goes here
    return false;
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    bool IsThing_ = IsThing();
    if ( IsThing_ )
    {
        printf( "foo\n" );
        return 1;
    }

    return 0;
}

In release mode, Visual Studio will convert this code to this:

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    return 0;
}

Of course, since IsThing is no longer needed, no code is generated for it, and thus you can't set breakpoints in it.

Now, it may well be that if you stuff enough code into the function that actually does things (such as file-I/O) and do not hard code a return of false, that the compiler will indeed make it into a function that does get called. But compilers these days are very good at eliminating code that doesn't produce anything "meaningful".

I don't think there is any great mystery here - it's just the way compilers work.

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