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Good day to everyone!

I tried to tackle the basic problem of obtaining the original signal from observing its convolution with some known impulse response.

But the results I get are somehow totally wrong, and probably I have a mix of different wrong steps here. I've already looked through similar topics here and on other sites like developpez, but failed to figure out the cause. I would appreciate any help.

Let's say my true signal f[.] is just an impulse at the time 1, and the impulse response g[.] is Gaussian. I compute their convolution h[.] by conv(), and then, basically, want to find ifft( fft[h]./fft[g] ), expecting this to be f[.].

The first problem is that conv() makes an array of the n+m-1 elements, where n,m are the lengths of the argument arrays. So, to perform fft[h]./fft[g] I need to do smth with the length of g. It's the first suspicious place where I may act wrong (see the code). What's the right way to do it?

The second problem is that I get something very different from what the initial true signal.

The third problem is that I can't understand how to takle the signal shifts. In matlab, I have to operate with positive-time signals, but, for example, the gaussian impulse response has both time-negative and time-positive elements, so, to work with it here, I need to shift it 'forward' (the peek will move to the right), and than I need to 'de-shift' the result?

Thanks!

Here's my crap on that :)

close all;

TrueSignal = zeros( 101, 1 ); % impulse in t = 1.
TrueSignal( 1 ) = 1;
ImpulseResp = normpdf(-1:0.02:1)/normpdf( 0 ); % 101 elements array

figure;
subplot( 2,2,1 );
title('True signal')
plot( TrueSignal );
subplot( 2,2,2 );
title('Impulse response')
plot( ImpulseResp );

Conv = conv( TrueSignal, ImpulseResp ); % produces 201 elements array.
subplot( 2,2,3 );
title('Convolution')
plot( Conv );

% Wrong? I need a 201 elements array to represent the impulse response.
ImpulseResp_sparse = normpdf( -1:0.01:1 )/normpdf( 0 );
FIR = fft( ImpulseResp_sparse )/201;

Inverse = ifft( fft( Conv )./FIR ); % UPD Added fft() according to one of comments, bad mistake, but still not preventing.

subplot( 2,2,4 );
title('What is that???')
plot( abs( Inverse ) ); % It's weird! With no abs(), result is even more weird! 
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Eitan T, Shai, Björn Kaiser, Arun, Ragunath Jawahar Mar 12 '13 at 20:07

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
A FFT assumes that your signal is periodic. You can deal with this by using appropriate padding. The FFT chapter in Numerical Recipes discusses this, and might be helpful here. –  sfstewman Mar 11 '13 at 21:31
    
See also Wikipedia's explanation of Circular Convolution, particularly the diagram. Using the FFT/IFFT to compute convolutions is possible but you have to pay attention to the details. You may have better luck with this question on dsp.stackexchange.com. –  mtrw Mar 11 '13 at 21:36
    
Related question: Verify the convolution theorem –  Eitan T Mar 11 '13 at 22:10
    
Thanks everyone! I got lots of information to think about, which was definitely very useful! –  gron Mar 12 '13 at 7:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A straightforward use of fft for convolution will result in circular convolution, whereas what you want (and what conv does) is linear convolution. So to implement such a scheme with fft, you will have to zero pad the signals to length m+n-1.

Here's an example showing equivalence between the output of conv and fft based linear convolution:

x=rand(4,1);y=rand(3,1); %sample data
out1=conv(x,y);          %output from conv()
X=fft(x,6);Y=fft(y,6);   %zero pad and compute fft
out2=ifft(X.*Y);         %output from fft based lin. conv.

You can check that out1 and out2 are the same (to within FP precision).

Reformulate your problem in this manner and you should be good to go. I can't figure out what you're asking re: shifts, but you might want to look into fftshift and ifftshift.

share|improve this answer
  1. You may want to use filter(g, 1, f) instead of conv(g, f) to avoid the problem with resulting length. Or cut the resulting array.
  2. It looks like you have forgotten to make one fft: Inverse = ifft( fft(Conv)./FIR );

This works for me:

   close all;

   TrueSignal = zeros( 101, 1 ); % impulse in t = 1.
   TrueSignal( 1 ) = 1;
   ImpulseResp = normpdf(-1:0.02:1)/normpdf( 0 ); % 101 elements array

   figure;
   subplot( 2,2,1 );
   title('True signal')
   plot( TrueSignal );
   subplot( 2,2,2 );
   title('Impulse response')
   plot( ImpulseResp );

   Conv = filter( TrueSignal, 1, ImpulseResp ); 
   subplot( 2,2,3 );
   title('Convolution')
   plot( Conv );

   fftConv = fft(Conv);

   FIR = fft( ImpulseResp );

   Inverse = ifft( fftConv./FIR );

   subplot( 2,2,4 );
   plot( abs( Inverse ) );
  1. As it is said, FFT assumes that signal is periodic. If you want to analyze aperiodic signal, you need to use "windowed FFT" algorithm to improve quality. It is almost the same, but you are to multiply your input by a special window function (e. g. Blackman). Adding padding also works but it the most computationally-expensive way.
share|improve this answer
    
+1: Given the fact that the question is about conv, Instead of filter, I would suggest keeping the conv and post-pad the FFT results with zeroes using the commands fft(Conv, N) and fft(ImpulseResp, N), where N = length(TrueSignal) + length(ImpulseResp) - 1. Also, there is no need to divide fft(Conv) and fft(ImpulseResp) by the length of the singal. –  Eitan T Mar 11 '13 at 23:14
    
Thanks a lot! I will try that out, I definitely need some theoretical reading on FFT. –  gron Mar 12 '13 at 7:49

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