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I'm writing an application that syncs files over an FTP site. Right now it's working by connecting through regular FTP, but now our IT guys want to set this up over a secure FTPS connection.

They provided me with a .cr certificate file. If I open the file in notepad I see something like this (but with real keys not foobar obviously).

-----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE   
FOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBAR
FOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBAR    
FOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBAR    
FOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBAR    
FOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBAR    
FOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBAR    
FOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBAR    
FOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBAR    
FOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBAR    
FOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBAR    
-----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
FOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBAR    
FOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBAR    
FOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBAR    
FOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBAR    
FOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBAR    
FOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBAR    
FOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBAR    
FOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBAR    
FOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBARFOOBAR    
-----END CERTIFICATE-----

How can I use this certificate file to connect to the FTPS server to upload and download files? Forgive me but I'm very new to anything involving transferring files over a network, secure connections, certificates, public keys, private keys, etc...etc...

I think I'd want to use an FtpWebRequest object and set the EnableSsl property to true. But I'm not not sure where this certificate file comes into play.

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3 Answers 3

This article explains how to do it, with source code.

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I'm looking at that article and a copy of the source code. But I can't figure out where I would add in this certificate file. –  Eric Anastas Oct 8 '09 at 2:16
    
Thanks Eric J, I actaully have the same question as the original poster and that's the code that I'm using (what you have linked)....still trying to figure out how to pass my "hostkey" into that code. –  ganders Aug 20 '12 at 16:09

I have used SharpSSH with good success.

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If you're using the FtpWebRequest Class, you just need to add some things to the setup of the request. Be sure to include the using System.Security.Cryptography.X509Certificates; statement.

    FtpWebRequest request = (FtpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(ftpUrl);
    request.Credentials = new NetworkCredential(userName, password);

    request.EnableSsl = true;
    //ServicePointManager.ServerCertificateValidationCallback = ServicePointManager_ServerCertificateValidationCallback;

    X509Certificate cert = X509Certificate.CreateFromCertFile(@"C:\MyCertDir\MyCertFile.cer");
    X509CertificateCollection certCollection = new X509CertificateCollection();
    certCollection.Add(cert);

    request.ClientCertificates = certCollection;

Also, if you have problems with the certificate generating exceptions you may need to implement your own certificate validation callback method for use with the ServicePointManager.ServerCertificateValidationCallback Property. This can be as simple as always returning true or be more sophisticated like the one I use for debugging:

    public static bool ServicePointManager_ServerCertificateValidationCallback(object sender, X509Certificate certificate, X509Chain chain, SslPolicyErrors sslPolicyErrors)
    {
        bool allowCertificate = true;

        if (sslPolicyErrors != SslPolicyErrors.None)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Accepting the certificate with errors:");
            if ((sslPolicyErrors & SslPolicyErrors.RemoteCertificateNameMismatch) == SslPolicyErrors.RemoteCertificateNameMismatch)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("\tThe certificate subject {0} does not match.", certificate.Subject);
            }

            if ((sslPolicyErrors & SslPolicyErrors.RemoteCertificateChainErrors) == SslPolicyErrors.RemoteCertificateChainErrors)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("\tThe certificate chain has the following errors:");
                foreach (X509ChainStatus chainStatus in chain.ChainStatus)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("\t\t{0}", chainStatus.StatusInformation);

                    if (chainStatus.Status == X509ChainStatusFlags.Revoked)
                    {
                        allowCertificate = false;
                    }
                }
            }

            if ((sslPolicyErrors & SslPolicyErrors.RemoteCertificateNotAvailable) == SslPolicyErrors.RemoteCertificateNotAvailable)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("No certificate available.");
                allowCertificate = false;
            }

            Console.WriteLine();
        }

        return allowCertificate;
    }
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