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$DB_HOST = "localhost";
$DB_NAME = "rawr";
$DB_USER = "rawr";
$DB_PASS = "hunter2!";
$tableprefix = "hunter_";
$mysqli = new mysqli($DB_HOST, $DB_USER, $DB_PASS, $DB_NAME);
if (mysqli_connect_errno()) {
    printf("Connect failed: %s\n", mysqli_connect_error());
    exit();
}
    class ACL
{....

I currently have that, but I am unable to use that db connection in all of my ACL commands. How can I gain the ability to use that db connection inside my class?

share|improve this question
    
Nice password ;-)). –  Bart Friederichs Mar 11 '13 at 21:41
    
@BartFriederichs, It's honestly not real. –  swag31 Mar 11 '13 at 21:41
    
I got that, I read bash.org as well –  Bart Friederichs Mar 11 '13 at 21:42

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your $mysqli is just out of scope. You have to options:

1) Use global variables.

function XXXX () {
    global $mysqli;
    ...
}

2) Pass it into the constructor (this is better)

public function __construct($mysqli) {
    $this->_mysqli = $mysqli;
}

And then refer to it from within your class just with $this->_mysqli

share|improve this answer
    
unexpected T_OBJECT_OPERATOR –  swag31 Mar 11 '13 at 21:47
    
what PHP version are you using? –  ikaros45 Mar 11 '13 at 21:51
    
The newest..... –  swag31 Mar 11 '13 at 21:53
    
Ah yeah, sorry I placed $ sign in the wrong place. Try with $this->_mysqli = $mysqli; –  ikaros45 Mar 11 '13 at 21:55
    
No error, but it didn't do anything. –  swag31 Mar 11 '13 at 21:57

You need to pass that mysqli instance to your ACL class when you instantiate it. It does not automatically know about local variables declared outside of the class declaration.

share|improve this answer
    
Would I do this in construct? How would I do it? –  swag31 Mar 11 '13 at 21:43
    
Yes. Just accept a parameter of $db or something in your __construct() function, and pass that in when you create a new ACL. –  Brad Mar 11 '13 at 21:52

Make sure the connection you are using is in the right environment. You can do it e.g. with global:

class ACL {
    function DoSomething() {
        global $mysqli;
        ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer

you can wrap your mysqli in a class such as:

class database {
    // do database stuff here
}

and extend ACL

class ACL extends database {
    // do acl stuff here with all your database stuff available
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Although this works, it is against OOP. ACL is not a Database. –  ikaros45 Mar 11 '13 at 21:52
 class ACL {

       public function __construct() {
            $DB_HOST = "localhost";
            $DB_NAME = "rawr";
            $DB_USER = "rawr";
            $DB_PASS = "hunter2!";
            $tableprefix = "hunter_";
            $conn = new mysqli($DB_HOST, $DB_USER, $DB_PASS, $DB_NAME);
            if (mysqli_connect_errno()) {
                   printf("Connect failed: %s\n", mysqli_connect_error());
                   exit();
            } else {       
                   $this->conn = $conn;
            }
       }

       public function command1()
       {
            //use connection object as $this->conn 
            ///your code
       }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't this result in more than one connection per php page load? –  swag31 Mar 11 '13 at 21:58
    
yes...you can write another private function to close the connection and then call it in all your commands or change the private function connect() to public function __construct() –  Girish Mar 11 '13 at 22:01

Here's another approach. Abstract your database connection into a separate utility class:

<?php
class DB
{
    const DB_HOST = "localhost";
    const DB_NAME = "rawr";
    const DB_USER = "rawr";
    const DB_PASS = "hunter2!";

    protected static $instance;
    public static function instance()
    {
        if (empty(self::$instance))
        {
            self::$instance = new mysqli(self::DB_HOST, self::DB_USER, self::DB_PASS, self::DB_NAME);
        }

        return self::$instance;
    }
}

This isn't inversion of control, but database access is so central to most apps that it's pretty safe to use as a pattern.

<?php

// Note: make sure DB class is loaded!

class ACL // Note: this doesn't extend DB!
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        // you can now access your $mysqli object with DB::instance()
    }
}
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