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I'm a noob to Cocos2D-X, but I've been programming for quite some time... I was wondering what the point of this code is:

my confusion is mostly with this part:

bool bRet = false; do { } while(0)

here is the whole method to give some context:

  bool GameScene::init()
    {
        CCLog("GameScene::init");
    bool bRet = false;
    do 
    {
        //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
        // super init first
        //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
        CC_BREAK_IF(! CCLayer::init());

            // Initialize the parent - gets the sprite sheet loaded, sets the background and inits the clouds
            MainScene::init();

            // Start off as game suspended
            gameSuspended = true;

            // Get the bird sprite
            CCSprite *bird = CCSprite::createWithSpriteFrame(CCSpriteFrameCache::sharedSpriteFrameCache()->spriteFrameByName("bird.png"));
            this->addChild(bird, 4, kBird);

            // Initialize the platforms
            initPlatforms();

            // Create the bonus sprite
            CCSprite *bonus;

            // Load in the bonus images, 5, 10, 50, 100
            for(int i=0; i<kNumBonuses; i++) 
            {
                    bonus = CCSprite::createWithSpriteFrame(CCSpriteFrameCache::sharedSpriteFrameCache()->spriteFrameByName(bonus_image[i]));
                    this->addChild(bonus,4, kBonusStartTag+i);
                    bonus->setVisible(false);
            }

            // Create the Score Label
            CCLabelBMFont* scoreLabel = CCLabelBMFont::labelWithString("0",  "Images/bitmapFont.fnt");
            this->addChild(scoreLabel, 5, kScoreLabel);

            // Center the label
            scoreLabel->setPosition(ccp(CCDirector::sharedDirector()->getWinSize().width/2,CCDirector::sharedDirector()->getWinSize().height - 50));

            // Start the GameScene stepping
            schedule(schedule_selector(GameScene::step));

            // Enable the touch events
            setTouchEnabled(true);
            // Enable accelerometer events
            setAccelerometerEnabled(true);

            // Start the game
            startGame();

    bRet = true;
} while (0);

return bRet;
}

this code comes from: https://code.google.com/p/tweejump-cocos2dx/source/browse/trunk/Classes/GameScene.cpp

it's an open source game.

I understand that bRet stands for bool return value, but I'm confused on a few things... One reason I'm confused by this is why even program like this? secondly how does the while loop know when bRet == false if it's just equal to 0... am I missing something?

My other question is how do you know when to use the syntax CCdataType* varName = ..., vs. CCdataType *pVarName = ... I know that the second one is a pointer, but maybe I'm missing something... I don't understand the difference. is the first one a deference statement?

share|improve this question
    
That's the whole code? do { }while(0) is a nop - there seems to be something missing. – Voo Mar 11 '13 at 23:48
    
no I was using it as an example there is a lot usually in there... It's usually from the scene::init() method... I just left it out, because it can be ambiguous... I'm cocos2d-X by looking at open source games out there, and I've seen this in many of them. – AlexW.H.B. Mar 11 '13 at 23:52
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your example misses the essential part which explains everything - the real logic within code. I am not an expert on Cocos, but from what I can see, it is typically used like this:

bool bRet = false;
do 
{
    CC_BREAK_IF(!conditionA); // same as  if (!conditionA) break;
    ... some code which possibly sets bRet
    CC_BREAK_IF(!conditionB);        
    ... some other code which possibly sets bRet
    CC_BREAK_IF(!conditionC);        
    ... some other code which possibly sets bRet
    bRet = true;
} while (0);
return bRet;

in this case, it allows code to jump to return statement without needing to resort to goto, or nesting a bunch of if statements. Compare it to this:

bool bRet = false;
if (conditionA); 
{
    ... some code which possibly sets bRet
    if (conditionB)
    {
        ... some other code which possibly sets bRet
        if (conditionC);        
        {
            ... some other code which possibly sets bRet
        }
    }
}
bRet = true;

return bRet;
share|improve this answer
    
oh that makes way more sense... the wile statement breaks if the CC_Break_If returns 0? – AlexW.H.B. Mar 11 '13 at 23:57
1  
yes. break breaks any loop construct in C/C++ – Zdeslav Vojkovic Mar 11 '13 at 23:58

I found the rationale on the Cocos2d-x forum.

Previously, the developer of Cocos2d-x wrote code that managed it's clean up with gotos:

#define check(ret)  if(!ret) goto cleanup;

void func()
{
  bool bRet = false;

  bRet = doSomething();
  check(bRet);
  bRet = doSomethingElse();
  check(bRet);

  bRet = true;

cleanup:
  // Do clean up here

  return bRet;
}

As you can see, this is a really icky way of jumping to the clean up at the end of the function if anything goes wrong along the way. Each call to a function returns whether it was successful or not. Then the check macro is used to see if bRet is true and if it isn't, jumps straight to the cleanup label.

Then he decided to get rid of the gotos and change it to break from a do while loop:

#define CC_BREAK_IF(cond)  if(!cond) break;

void func()
{
  bool bRet = false;

  do {
    bRet = doSomething();
    CC_BREAK_IF(bRet);
    bRet = doSomethingElse();
    CC_BREAK_IF(bRet);

    bRet = true;
  } while (0);

  // Do clean up here

  return bRet;
}

This has precisely the same effect. It just uses break as a goto mechanism to jump to the code after the do while loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Compare this with my rewrite of the supposedly problematic code: gist.github.com/LearnCocos2D/5139277 no odd language constructs like do/while(0) are needed – LearnCocos2D Mar 12 '13 at 0:38

There is no point, it's just bad style. The whole method could (and should) be rewritten as:

bool GameScene::init()
{
    CCLog("GameScene::init");

    if (!CCLayer::init())
        return false;

    // Initialize the parent - gets the sprite sheet loaded, sets the background and inits the clouds
    MainScene::init();

    // … lots of scene setup code here ...

    return true;
}

I've seen similar code where the engine runs its main loop, but in that case it'll be an endless loop:

do
{
    // run game loop as fast as it can

    // end the game
    if (userQuits)
        break;
} while(true);

Even if you needed the extra scope, for example to avoid name clashes of local variables, a pair of extra braces would suffice. Like so:

{
    int x = 10;
    // do stuff
}
{
    int x = 234; // this x is in its own scope
    // do other stuff
}
share|improve this answer
    
If you have to have lots of cleanup code, doing it your way means lots of duplication. That said gotos in c are a sensible way to handle cleanup, in C++ there's RAII. – Voo Mar 12 '13 at 0:09
    
What would need to be duplicated? Multiple cases where init could fail and would have to return false? In that case, given there's already a CC_BREAK_IF macro there could also be a CC_RETURN_FALSE_IF macro. ;) – LearnCocos2D Mar 12 '13 at 0:12
    
If it's not just return false; but instead doStuff1(); doStuff2(); return false; - then you'll have to duplicate the calls to doStuffX all the time. In c++ you can use RAII to avoid the whole problem all together, in C you can have lots of nested ifs, but the goto/break solution is a well known solution to this problem and used e.g. also in the linux kernel. – Voo Mar 12 '13 at 0:15
    
@LearnCocos2D many people dislike having multiple return statements. – Zdeslav Vojkovic Mar 12 '13 at 0:16
    
Me too, except for returns as early out at the top of the function. I see this issue runs a little deeper with more complex code, but it really shouldn't litter code where it's not needed. And given the example on the cocos2d-x forum I don't see why it's not rewritten by using if/else and return value only set to true when all conditions (init, create, alloc something) have succeeded. IMHO that's cleaner and easier to read. – LearnCocos2D Mar 12 '13 at 0:20

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