Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm reading the kernel of Linux 0.12, the codes in inode.c:

static int _bmap(struct m_inode * inode,int block,int create)
{
    struct buffer_head * bh;
    int i;

    if (block<0)
        panic("_bmap: block<0");
    if (block >= 7+512+512*512)
        panic("_bmap: block>big");
    if (block<7) {
        if (create && !inode->i_zone[block])
            if (inode->i_zone[block]=new_block(inode->i_dev)) {
                inode->i_ctime=CURRENT_TIME;
                inode->i_dirt=1;
            }
        return inode->i_zone[block];
    }
block -= 7;
    if (block<512) {
        if (create && !inode->i_zone[7])
            if (inode->i_zone[7]=new_block(inode->i_dev)) {
                inode->i_dirt=1;
                inode->i_ctime=CURRENT_TIME;
            }
        if (!inode->i_zone[7])
            return 0;
        if (!(bh = bread(inode->i_dev,inode->i_zone[7])))
            return 0;
        i = ((unsigned short *) (bh->b_data))[block];
        if (create && !i)
            if (i=new_block(inode->i_dev)) {
                ((unsigned short *) (bh->b_data))[block]=i;
                bh->b_dirt=1;
            }
        brelse(bh);
        return i;
    }
block -= 512;
    if (create && !inode->i_zone[8])
        if (inode->i_zone[8]=new_block(inode->i_dev)) {
            inode->i_dirt=1;
            inode->i_ctime=CURRENT_TIME;
        }
    if (!inode->i_zone[8])
        return 0;
    if (!(bh=bread(inode->i_dev,inode->i_zone[8])))
        return 0;
    i = ((unsigned short *)bh->b_data)[block>>9];
    if (create && !i)
        if (i=new_block(inode->i_dev)) {
            ((unsigned short *) (bh->b_data))[block>>9]=i;
            bh->b_dirt=1;
        }
    brelse(bh);
    if (!i)
        return 0;
    if (!(bh=bread(inode->i_dev,i)))
        return 0;
    i = ((unsigned short *)bh->b_data)[block&511];
    if (create && !i)
        if (i=new_block(inode->i_dev)) {
            ((unsigned short *) (bh->b_data))[block&511]=i;
            bh->b_dirt=1;
        }
    brelse(bh);
    return i;
}

I konw that i_zone[0] ~ i_zone[6] can store a block. But the i_zone how to stand for 512 blocks? and i_zone[8] how to stand for 512*512 blocks ?

Thank you

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

i_zone[0] through i_zone[6] store the addresses of 7 data blocks. These are "direct" blocks.

i_zone[7] stores the address of a block which itself stores the addresses of 512 data blocks. This is an "indirect" block.

i_zone[8] stores the address of a block which itself stores the address of 512 indirect blocks, which each store the addresses of 512 data blocks. This is a "double indirect" block.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you. "i_zone[7] stores the address of a block which itself stores the addresses of 512 data blocks." the addresses is the start address of the 512 blcoks ? –  lxgeek Mar 12 '13 at 0:18
    
@lxgeek: The block addressed by i_zone[7] is an array of 512 block addresses. –  caf Mar 12 '13 at 1:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.