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I have been searching for answers to this problem for a while, and I cannot seem to find a solution. When the arguments are of different lengths, there is no error. When they are of the same length, the segfault error occurs. The function is meant to compare two strings and return a new string that contains the largest of each ith character. My function is as follows:

   char* charMax(char* string1, char* string2) 
   {
        int length1 = strlen(string1);
        printf("%d", length1);
        int length2 = strlen(string2);

        int lengthLarge = length1 >= length2 ? length1 : length2;
        int lengthSmall = length1 <= length2 ? length1 : length2;

        char* largerString = length1 >= length2 ? string1 : string2;
        char* result = malloc(lengthLarge + 1);


        for (int i = 0; i < lengthSmall; i++) 
            result[i] = string1[i] > string2[i] ? string1[i] : string2[i];

        if (length1 != length2) 
        {
            for (int i = lengthSmall; i < lengthLarge; i++) 
                result[i] = largerString[i];

            result[lengthLarge + 1] = '\0';

            return result;

            free(result);
        }
    }

Thanks for the help!

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closed as too broad by Mitch Wheat, Nik Bougalis, RaYell, abligh, Harry Johnston Mar 7 at 0:18

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2 Answers

Well, it might have something to do with the fact that when the two strings have exactly the same length your function never returns anything, so it's result is garbage. Which is then interpreted as a pointer. And... well... you know what comes next, don't you?

Let's properly indent that code and add some commentary, shall we?

char* charMax(char* string1, char* string2) {
    int length1 = strlen(string1);
    printf("%d", length1);
    int length2 = strlen(string2);
    int lengthLarge = length1 >= length2 ? length1 : length2;
    int lengthSmall = length1 <= length2 ? length1 : length2;

    char* largerString = length1 >= length2 ? string1 : string2;
    char* result = malloc(lengthLarge + 1);

    for (int i = 0; i < lengthSmall; i++) {
        result[i] = string1[i] > string2[i] ? string1[i] : string2[i];
    }
    if (length1 != length2) {
        for (int i = lengthSmall; i < lengthLarge; i++) {
            result[i] = largerString[i];
        }

        result[lengthLarge + 1] = '\0';

        return result;

        free(result); /* uhm, what? this will never execute */
    }

    /* oops - what happens now? who knows? */
}
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I put the bracket in the wrong place. What a dumb mistake. Thanks. –  user2159044 Mar 12 '13 at 2:33
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There are several problems, Nik's answer points out the major one. Another one is here:

result[lengthLarge + 1] = '\0'; // out of bounds! 
// this should be result[lengthLarge] = '\0'

Also, this signature is better for your purpose:

char* charMax(const char *string1, const char *string2);
share|improve this answer
    
Good catch! I totally missed that! –  Nik Bougalis Mar 12 '13 at 1:43
    
Thanks for the help. I am new to C, what is the difference between char* string1 and char *string1? I understand the difference between char string1[], but I did not realize there was another option. –  user2159044 Mar 12 '13 at 2:37
    
@user2159044, they are totally same but pointer definition is generally written next to the variable name not the type (int a, *b defines an integer and pointer). I actually suggested using const to be able to pass literal strings. –  perreal Mar 12 '13 at 2:58
    
@user2159044 - @perreal was mostly referring to using const not to the location of the '*'. const indicates to the caller (of the function) that the value passed will not be modified. –  acarlow Mar 12 '13 at 3:02
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